The Latest from Germany

Nov 25 6:04am
Berlin

30th Anniversary

by Zoe

On November 9, 1989, the Berlin Wall fell. We’ve all read about it. People from the East and West rushed across the border, hugging and kissing and celebrating with anyone and everyone in sight. The Peaceful Revolution had worked: the German Democratic Republic had crumbled. Earlier this month, as people celebrated the 30th anniversary of German Reunification, emotions were high for many Berliners as they reflected on the anniversary and the time since. I have felt so lucky to be here to experience the celebrations with the Germans that it affected personally.

Nov 22 3:59am
Berlin

Do you have the notes? A Guide to Playing in the HU Orchestra

by Elena

A few weeks ago, I had the honor of joining the Humboldt University Symphonic Orchestra for the Info-Probe (first info-rehearsal). And I would like to share with you some things I would suggest noticing if you are ever in this situation.

Nov 17 4:22pm
Berlin

Finding Nuance: “30 Years Peaceful Revolution - The Fall of the Wall”

by Elena

In so many European cities, one feels the history while walking down the narrow streets, climbing up stone steps - worn by hundreds of years of treading feet, or admiring the architecture that took generations to complete. It’s easy to imagine thousands of women in corsets and bustles and men in coattails and top hats crowded into the parks beneath the Eiffel Tower for the 1889 World’s Fair.

Nov 7 4:44am
Berlin

Living in a Wohngemeinschaft

by Zoe

When most people think of a homestay in Berlin, they think of a standard small apartment in the city with maybe one person, a couple, or a small family. They have a roommate-type relationship with the host family that requires limited interaction. I am having the opposite of a typical homestay experience. I live with eleven people. You read that right: ELEVEN.

Oct 28 11:43am
Freiburg

Living with a Language Barrier

by Elizabeth

In most cases of study abroad, it should not come as a surprise that your new 'home away from home' speaks a different language. Maybe you speak that country’s language, maybe you are learning that language, or maybe you do not speak it at all. No matter the case, that language barrier is still there and adds to the experience of culture shock.