Downtown Dublin Study Abroad

Dublin

Ireland

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Study abroad in Dublin to begin your journey in the cultural center (and heart) of Ireland.

Just think, you’ll be studying in Dublin, the City of Literature that’s home to such greats as George Bernard Shaw, Oscar Wilde, William Butler Yeats, and Samuel Beckett.

Stroll along the River Liffey, visit Dublin Castle, and take in an Irish play at the Abbey Theatre. Enjoy the energetic music scene and lively theatre with your new local and international friends. (Did we metnion that the Irish are known for their hospitatlity?) And when you need to get away, you’ll discover outdoor adventures just a short train or bus ride away.

No matter your interests, there is something for everyone studying abroad in Dublin.

Our Dublin study abroad programs and internships have it all, whether you want to hone your craft on our Writers Program, sharpen your theatre skills with Intensive Acting, tap into Dublin’s thriving software and tech industries, or work a full-time internship.

Programs

Dublin - Business, Entrepreneurship & Technology

Dublin
,
Ireland
Length: 
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
Language prerequisites: 
None
Estimated Cost: 
$17,500
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Dublin - Irish Studies

Dublin
,
Ireland
Length: 
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
Language prerequisites: 
None
Estimated Cost: 
$17,500
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Dublin - Writers Program

Dublin
,
Ireland
Length: 
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
Language prerequisites: 
None
Estimated Cost: 
$17,500
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Dublin Direct Enrollment - Dublin City University

Dublin
,
Ireland
Length: 
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
Language prerequisites: 
None
Estimated Cost: 
$17,200
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Dublin Direct Enrollment - National Theatre School of Ireland-Gaiety School of Acting

Dublin
,
Ireland
Length: 
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
Language prerequisites: 
None
Estimated Cost: 
$18,820
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Dublin Direct Enrollment - Trinity College Dublin

Dublin
,
Ireland
Length: 
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
Language prerequisites: 
None
Estimated Cost: 
$23,270
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Dublin Direct Enrollment – University College Dublin

Dublin
,
Ireland
Length: 
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
Language prerequisites: 
None
Estimated Cost: 
$21,800
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Dublin Summer - Intensive Acting

Dublin
,
Ireland
Length: 
Summer 2019
Language prerequisites: 
None
Estimated Cost: 
$7,560
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Dublin Summer - Internship

Dublin
,
Ireland
Length: 
Summer 2019
Language prerequisites: 
Non-native English speakers will need to refer to Application Requirements
Estimated Cost: 
$7,190
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Dublin Summer - Irish Studies

Dublin
,
Ireland
Length: 
Summer 2019
Language prerequisites: 
None
Estimated Cost: 
$6,900
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Dublin – Full-Time Semester Internship

Dublin
,
Ireland
Length: 
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
Language prerequisites: 
Non-native English speakers will need to refer to Application Requirements
Estimated Cost: 
$8,585
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Dublin's Top Five

Take a Day Trip

Just a short train ride away are the towns of Howth, Dun Laoghaire and more. Let the explorer in you roam, and hike along the coast.

Catch a Live Performance

From traditional folk music to cutting-edge theatre, Dublin has it all. Venture to the theatre, or enjoy live music at your local pub.

Taste the Local Food

Irish stew, shepherd’s pie, boxty, and more—sink your teeth into the various fresh and delicious foods of Dublin.

Visit the Book of Kells

See this lavishly illustrated manuscript, located in the beautiful Trinity College Library.

Explore the Neighborhoods

Walk along the River Liffey, and meander through the city. Be sure to stop at Fitzwilliam Square and Merrion Square for the famous colorful painted doors.

Take a Virtual Tour

brick building in Dublin

Click to launch the virtual tour.

The Latest from Dublin

Dublin

SIM Cards and Stress-Crying: Day One!

by Alex

After landing on foreign soil for the first time on Tuesday, I am now writing this from my gorgeous IES Abroad housing, where I am unpacked, well-rested, and most importantly, completely set up in the electronics department.  This took me time, tears, and ten thousand steps, and it's become quite the lesson that I wished I was prepared for, which has inspired this post.

Some backstory about me: two years ago, I moved to Pittsburgh after living in small towns all my life.  I was absolutely terrified and was facing a super steep learning curve.  Things like public transportation, safety, and navigating such a large place were completely foreign to me, even though they're second-nature now.  

I cannot remember a more stressful time in my life. I spent my first two weeks crying in public bathrooms and bothering my RA for advice. But, my philosophy was this: I can get out of any jam as long as I have my phone.  

Thus, Google was my best friend for those first couple weeks. I found directions, restaurants, and detailed guides of how to use the bus system. Because of that experience, I was never that nervous about getting to Dublin and being on my own. I knew that my maps app could take me wherever I needed to go, and I could surely figure out taxis and buses with some quick searches.  

While I now think Dublin is quite similar to Pittsburgh (only much cleaner and prettier), I was missing one essential component when I got off the plane. My phone wasn't getting the service or data that I was told it would have, so I found myself in a jam that I had never been in before, and the one thing I relied on for help was out of commission.  

Part of me feels like this is a bit of a first-world problem, but when you really think about it, most of us rely entirely on cell phones. I sure do. I knew this, so I made sure to go to my phone provider before I left and ask what my best option for talking and texting was for this trip, and they told me to simply turn my phone off once I landed. Once I turned it back on again, all was supposed to be well and working just like it did in the states. I was skeptical, but decided to trust the professionals.  

Luckily for me, I have a friend from my home school who is studying abroad in Dublin as well, and she was the only person I was able to reach. She told me that all I had to do was use some free wi-fi (which is quite plentiful in Dublin) to find my nearest Vodaphone and get a new SIM card. I then was swept outside to a huge line of people waiting for taxis, which I had never used without an app. I managed to get to my hotel, where I finally got to sit down and figure out my options. 

I made it to a Vodaphone with the help of my new housemate, and had a new SIM card within twenty minutes and twenty euros. I felt that this was too good to be true. Turns out, it was!

I am still getting used to the Irish accent, and the store was quite crowded. Therefore, I didn't understand that the card I was given only really worked on weekends. I also didn't understand that to change that, I had to download an app and select a new phone plan. I made this discovery after Facetiming my mom from my laptop while on the verge of a stress-cry because all I really wanted was to be able to use Google Maps outside of buildings.  

The most important thing that I forgot at the time was that I was exhausted from flying through five hours of time zones and had no right to be making any kind of imporant decision. Still, I just really wanted to get this done so I wouldn't have to worry about it anymore.

I was about to head back to Vodaphone to admit that I was incredibly confused and needed help of any kind (this is something I have already done often in Dublin, and the locals really are as nice and helpful as they are made out to be). It was then, by sheer luck, I saw a link to the app on my initial receipt, and managed to purchase myself the perfect phone plan for my needs at a very affordable price.  

I am now Google-mapping my way around town and loving every minute. The people are friendly, the food is delicious, and I already have a group of fellow students who are just as confused as I am.  

When I was going through this phone process, I kept feeling very guilty. I think of studying abroad as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that several students aren't able to have. The fact that I was stressed and upset at all was wearing on me, because I know that I am incredibly lucky to be here. However, I did not make any progress in solving my problem until I recognized that moving to a new continent on two hours of sleep is bound to be stressful for anyone.  

No written guide can fully prepare you for how different everything is (though I'm going to try my best to with these blog posts). Even though everyone speaks english, it feels like I'm learning a new language. A new phone plan, a new bus system, new slang, new everything. I know that by the time I leave it's going to be just as easy as living in Pittsburgh, but right now I feel like I've entered an alternate universe.  

My advice to future (or current) students abroad, and the point of this post, is that this incredible, amazing, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity can still be hard and scary. The whole point of studying abroad is to learn, and the stress and discomfort is a learning experience. I know that I'm on the precipice of an experience that I will remember for the rest of my life, just like when I moved to Pittsburgh. It will not always be pretty, but Dublin is a tameable beast that already has a special place in my heart, and I am so excited for the coming weeks!

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Dublin

Giant Steps to Dublin: An Introduction

by Jacob

I’ve never quite appreciated Bloomington nights like this one. Nobody is making sounds and the wild streets are empty. The stars are out, and their light is different tonight. Usually the streetlamps hide them, but a few have managed to cut through. The moon is dark, very dark, so difficult to see I almost missed it. The bugs and small animal noises aren’t annoying tonight, they’re quite comforting and familiar. One last summer night before I fly to Dublin.

Half a year in the making and all the forms and doctor appointments and financial deadlines are behind me. The flights are set and the planes are waiting for me in the cool runways, or perhaps in the cool sky before they meet with me tomorrow. The butterflies—no, the caterpillars—in my stomach keep me awake. I stopped worrying about the frantic logistics some time ago; everything is ready, and so am I.

For months I’ve been congratulated and awed over for this opportunity. “You are so lucky,” they often say, and I often agree. But the talking is over and I’m excited to be only a day away from leaving. The whole process has felt like the road to El Dorado: would I ever actually make it there? The semester was no help either, dragging by like a car on a downhill with spiked tires and no breaks, consistent but far too slow. Since completing finals my routine has slowed into a leisurely and boring daily aimlessness. Relaxation and little responsibility with an abundance of time is fine, but it’s made for a rather uneventful month. It’s hard to fathom that tomorrow is the day when the highlight of my college career begins.

My goal in Dublin is to be a sponge. A metaphorical sponge, though I will probably feel like a real one on rainy days. I’ll be soaking up as much experience I can, seeing as many people, places, strange foods and drinks, and events as I can. I’m a musician, so I hope to spend as much time learning about Irish musical tradition and blogging about it. Maybe I will meet Hurdy Gurdy man somewhere who will show me how to play, or some Gaelic singers to teach me all the strange and historic folk songs, or just a tunnel busker who will sing with me. Six weeks in Dublin is little time, yet I hope it will be enough to fill my head and this blog with at least a sliver of the Irish experience. I look forward to documenting what I can and have some fun along the way.

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12 Gifts for Students Studying Abroad

Our recent alumni shared their thoughts on the best gifts for students studying abroad, and we complied it into a helpful gift guide. Enjoy!.

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“I fell in love with Ireland for so many reasons. When I went away for trips I would refer to Ireland as 'home.'”

Karielle W. (Dublin Direct Enrollment – Dublin City University)