The Culture of Immigration

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Course Information
Discipline(s): 
Anthropology
Sociology
Terms offered: 
Spring
Credits: 
3
Language of instruction: 
English
Prerequisites: 
  • Previous course in social sciences is recommended, though not required.
Description: 

As a destination for migrants Austria is more attractive than ever before, receiving more migrants and asylum seekers than Germany or Switzerland, relative to its size. Austria is an immigration country, but politics and the public have realized this only partially. Migration is not a process to be understood only in economic and political terms but also as a socio-cultural process that is mediated by various others factors. This course, based on a conglomerate of various sources, should give a picture of Austria and its history of immigration. This includes an explanation of terms and typologies of migration, immigration and emigration where theories and models that consider the origins, the effects, and the continuities of people moving to different spaces are introduced. Furthermore the experiences as well as migrant communities and their networks in Vienna are introduced where special attention is given to the representation of immigrants in contemporary Austrian public discourses.

Attendance policy: 

IES Abroad Vienna requires attendance at all class sessions, including field study excursions, internship meetings, scheduled rehearsals, and exams. Attendance will be monitored and unexcused absences will affect the student’s grade via the “Participation” component of each course’s final grade.

Excused Absences

  • Excused absences are permitted only when a student is ill, when class is held on a recognized religious holiday traditionally observed by the particular student, or in the case of a grave incident affecting family members.
  • To be granted an excused absence, the student must write an email to his/her professor in a timely manner stating the reason for the absence (and, if appropriate, how long they expect to be away) with a cc to Center administrative staff. In an emergency, the student may call Student Services or the Front Desk. If the student is unable to send an email (too sick, no computer), he/she may call the Student Assistant at the front desk (01/512 2601-11) who will then write the email described above and send it to said parties as stated above, with a cc to the student.
  • If a student is absent 3 consecutive days or more, he/she will need to obtain a doctor’s note and then submit this to the Registrar’s office.
Learning outcomes: 

By the end of the course, students will be able to

  • Differentiate between the terms migration, immigration and emigration and consider these in relation to the Austrian political and historical setting.
  • Have a basic understanding of the current stand of research in the field of migration studies in the broader context of social and cultural anthropology.
  • Recognize the variable gender as a principle factor that characterizes social life and that operates in different aspects of migration.
  • Appreciate the opportunities and recognize the challenges of immigration.
  • Detect various discourses around immigrants in public debates and the media.
  • Realize common challenges and responses concerning people with migrant backgrounds in a globalized world.
Method of presentation: 
  • Lectures
  • Student presentations
  • Discussions
  • Field trips
  • Film viewing
Field study: 
  • Guided tour to the 1st district in Vienna: “The Turkish Vienna”: Das Türkische Wien. Spurensucheeiner Jahrhundert- lang währenden Feind-und Freundschaft.
  • Fieldtrip to a public institution that provides teaching assistance to children with migrational backgrounds.
  • African Catholic Community in the 5th district in Vienna.
  • Guest-presentation by a member of the organization ZARA: “Civil Courage and Anti-Racism Work”.
Required work and form of assessment: 
  • Class participation & Journal - 20%
  • Midterm exam - 20%
  • Presentation in class - 30%
  • Final exam & written assignment - 30%

Class Participation

Class participation refers to the extent students are involved in class and are prepared when coming to class, as well as actively participating in discussions and fieldtrips.

Journal

The journal consists of small exercises assigned on a weekly basis. In the journal students are expected to personally reflect on subject matters discussed in class, including current issues on immigration taken from weekly readings/listening of serious online newspapers/radio programs (Exp. Vienna Review, The Austrian Times, Fm4 Radio) to keep up to date on current immigration issues. They are asked to formulate their own opinions regarding topics.

Exams

The midterm and the final exam are a combination of the following types of questions: essay and short answers.

Presentation

The presentation gives students the opportunity to present their research findings from the written assignment.

Written Assignment

The written assignment is a research paper on a subject matter relevant to the course topic, and will be due in the last class session. The written assignment entails a list of references, a personal reflection and a literature review for a total length of 10-12 pages.

content: 
Week Readings/Content
Week 1: Introduction

Required Reading

  • Koser, Khalid. 2007. International Migration. A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press, 1-16.
  • Perchinig, Bernhard. 2007. “Migration in Austria”, in: Overhaus, Marco/Maull, Hanns W. and Harnisch, Sebastian (eds.): Foreign Policy in Dialogue Volume 8, Issue 22, May 2007, 25-33. URL.: http://www.deutsche-aussenpolitik.de/newsletter/issue22.pdf [Retrieved 5. 2.2011]
  • Böse, Martina/Haberfellner, Regina/Koldas ,Ayhan. 2001. A short Overview of Immigration to Austria in Mapping Minorities and their Media: The National Context, 2-10. URL.: https://www.zsi.at/attach/MinoritiesMedia_AT2001.pdf [Retrieved 5. 2.2011]

Recommended Reading

Week 2: History of Immigration to Austria

Required Reading

  • Fassman, Heinz/Reger, Ursula. 2008. “Austria: From Guest Worker Migration to a Country of Immigration”, IDEA Working Papers No. 1, Dec 2008, 3-21. URL.: http://www.idea6fp.uw.edu.pl/pliki/WP1_Austria.pdf [Retrieved 5. 2.2011]
  • Krzyzanowski, Michal/Wodak, Ruth 2008. Debating Migration in Austria. New Brunswick, NJ:Transaction Press. (selected readings)
  • Kraler, Albert/ Stacher, Irene. 2002. "Migration Dynamics in Austria: Patterns and Policies in the19th and 20th century" in: Historische Sozialkunde. Geschichte-Fachdidaktik-Politische Bildung, Special Issue 2002, International Migration, pp.51-65.

Recommended Reading

Week 3: Theories of Migration Part I

Required Reading

  • Brettell, Caroline B. 2008. “Migration Theory. Talking across Disciplines”, in: Brettell, Caroline B./Hollifield, James F. (eds.): Migration Theory. Talking Across Disciplines. New York/London: Routledge, 1-29.
  • Brettell, Caroline B. 2008. “Theorizing Migration in Anthropology. The Social Construction of Networks, Identities, Communities, and Globalscapes”, in: Brettell, Caroline B./Hollifield, James F. (eds.): Migration Theory. Talking Across Disciplines. New York/London: Routledge, 113-120.
  • Strasser, Sabine/Kroner, Gudrun/Herzog-Punzenberger, Barbara. 2009. “From Margin to Mainstream? Migration Studies and Social Anthropology in Austria”, in: Six-Hohenbalken, Maria/Tošić, Jelena (eds.): Anthropologie der Migration. Theoretische Grundlagen und interdisziplinäre Aspekte. Wien: Facultas. wuv, 127-142.
  • Watkins, Francis. 2003. “Migration”, in: Barnard, Alan/Spencer, Jonathan (eds.): Encyclopedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology. New York: Routledge, 370-371.

Recommended Reading

  • Werbner, Richard P. 1984. “The Manchester School in South-Central Africa”, in: Annual Review of

    Anthropology 13, 157-185.

Week 4: Theories of Migration Part II

Required Reading

  • Kearney, Michael. 1986. “From the Invisible Hand to Visible Feet. Anthropological Studies of Migration and Development”, in: Annual Review of Anthropology 15, 331-361.
  • Vertovek, Stevan. 2009. Transnationalism. New York: Routledge, 1-20.
  • Horevitz, Elisabeth. 2009. “Understanding the Anthropology of Immigration and Migration”, in: Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment. Volume 19, Issue 6,

    745–758.

Recommended Reading

  • Kimberlina, Sara E. 2009. “Synthesizing Social Science Theories of Immigration”, in: Journal of

    Human Behavior in the Social Environment. Volume 19, Issue 6, 2009, 759-771.

Week 5: Migration and Gender

Required Reading

  • Mahler, Sarah J./Pessar Patricia R. 2009. “Gender Matters. Ethnographers bring gender from the periphery toward the core of migration studies”, in: Six-Hohenbalken, Maria/Tošić, Jelena (eds.): Anthropologie der Migration. Theoretische Grundlagen und interdisziplinäre Aspekte. Wien: Facultas. wuv, 205-228.
  • Pine, Francis. 2003. “Gender”, in: Barnard, Alan/Spencer, Jonathan (eds.): Encyclopedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology. New York: Routledge, 253-261.

Recommended Reading

  • Pedraza, Silvia. 1991. “Women and Migration: The Social Consequence of Gender”, in:

    Annual Review of Sociology. Volume 17, Issue 10, 1991, 303-325
Week 6: Midterm
  • Midterm Exam
Week 7: The representations of immigrants in contemporary Austrian public discourses. Part 1

Required Reading

  • Silverstein, Paul A. 2005. “Immigrant Racialization and the New Savage Slot: Race, Migration, and Immigration in the New Europe”, in: Annual Review of Anthropology 34, 363-384.
  • Hall, Stuart. 2009. Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices. London: Sage, 223-291.
  • Schultz, Emily A./Lavenda, Robert H. 2008. “Anthropology in History and the explanation of Cultural Diversity”, in: Schultz, Emily A./Lavenda, Robert H. (eds.): Cultural Anthropology. A perspective on the Human Condition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 65-85.
  • Ashcroft, B., Griffiths G. & Tiffin, Helen. (2005). “Other/other”, in: Ashcroft, B., Griffiths G. &
  • Tiffin, Helen. (eds.): Post-Colonial Studies. The key Concepts. London, New York: Routledge, 94-95.
  • Ashcroft, B., Griffiths G. & Tiffin, Helen. (2005). Exotic/Exoticism. In: Post-Colonial Studies. The key concepts.London, New York: Routledge. 94-95
  • Pettigrew, Thomas. 1998. “Reactions towards the New Minorities of Western Europe”, in: Annual Review of Sociology 24, 77-103.
Week 8: The representations of immigrants in contemporary Austrian public discourses. Part 2

Required Reading

  • Gingrich, Andre. 1998. “Frontier Myths of Orientalism. The Muslim World in Public and Popular Cultures of Central Europe”, in: Baskar, Bojan/Brumen, Borut (eds.): Mess: Mediterranean Ethnological Summer School, Piran, Pirano, Slovenia 1996 Vol. 2. Ljubljana: Inštitut za multikulturne raziskave, 99-127.
  • Bunzl, Matti. 2005. “Between anti-Semitism and Islamophobia: Some thoughts on new Europe”, in: American Ethnologist 32/4, 499-508.
  • Böse, Martina/Haberfellner, Regina/Koldas ,Ayhan. 2001. A short Overview of Immigration to Austria in Mapping Minorities and their Media: The National Context. 10- 25 URL.: https://www.zsi.at/attach/MinoritiesMedia_AT2001.pdf [Retrieved 5. 2.2011]
  • Heath, Anthony/Rothan Catherine/Kilpi, Elina. 2008. “The Second Generation in Western Europe: Education, Unemployment, and Occupational Attainment”, in: Annual Review of Sociology 34, 211-235.

Field Trip: Das Türkische Wien: “The Turkish Vienna”, Seeking traces of a century long relationship. Guided tour in the 1st District.

Week 9: Migrant communities in Vienna.

Required Reading

  • World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous People. URL.: http://www.minorityrights.org/?lid=1879#current [Retrieved 5. 2.2011]
  • Butratana Kosita/ Trupp, Alexander. 2011. “Thai Communities in Vienna”, in: ASEAS –Austrian Journal of South- East Asian Studies, 4(1), 180-190.
  • Ahmed, Sara. 2000. “Home and Away: Narratives of Migration and Estrangement”, in Strange Encounters. Embodied others in Post-coloniality. London, New York: Routledge 75-95.

Film Viewing

  • “Harlem in Wien“ 2005

Field Trip: African Catholic Community in the 5th district in Vienna.

Week 10: Local examples of Global Connectedness: Part 1

Required Reading

  • Gupta, Akhil and Ferguson, James. 1992. “Beyond “Culture”: Space, Identity, and the politics of Difference”, in: Cultural Anthropology 7/1, 6-23.
  • Pollack, David C., and Van Reken, Ruth E. 2001. Third Culture Kids: The Experience of Growing Up Among Worlds. Yarmouth: Intercultural Press, 6-20.
  • Kearney, Michael. 1995. “The local and the global: The Anthropology of Globalization and Transnationalism”, in: Annual Review of Anthropology 24, 547-565.
  • Levitt, Peggy and Jaworsky Nadya. 2007. “Transnational Migration Studies: Past Developments and Future Trends”, in Annual Review of Sociology 33, 129-156.

Recommended Reading

  • Barth, Frederic (ed.). 1969. Ethnic groups and boundaries. The Social Organization of Culture Difference. Bergen: Universitetsforlaget.
  • Eriksen, Thomas H. 1996. “Ethnicity, Race, Class and Nation”, in: Hutchinson John/Smith Anthony. New York: Oxford Press, 25-35.

Week 11. Local examples of Global Connectedness: Part 2

Required Reading

  • Schultz, Emily A./Lavenda, Robert H. 2008. “Dimensions of Inequality in the Contemporary World: Class, Caste, Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism”, in: Schultz, Emily A./Lavenda, Robert H. (eds.): Cultural Anthropology. A perspective on the Human Condition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 327-355.
  • Givens, Terri. 2007. “Immigrant Integration in Europe: Empirical Research”. In: Annual Review of Political Science 10, 67-83. Recommended reading:
  • Anderson, Benedict. 2006. Imagined Communities. Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London/New York: Verso.
Week 11: Final
  • Final Exam

 

Required readings: 
  • Ahmed, Sara. 2000. “Home and Away: Narratives of Migration and Estrangement”, in Strange Encounters. Embodied others in Post-coloniality. London, New York: Routledge 75-95.
  • Ashcroft, B., Griffiths G. & Tiffin, Helen. (2005). “Other/other”, in: Ashcroft, B., Griffiths G. & Tiffin, Helen. (eds.): Post-Colonial Studies. The key Concepts. London, New York: Routledge, 94-95.
  • Böse, Martina/Haberfellner, Regina/Koldas ,Ayhan. 2001. A short Overview of Immigration to Austria in Mapping Minorities and their Media: The National Context, 2-25. URL.: https://www.zsi.at/attach/MinoritiesMedia_AT2001.pdf [Retrieved 5. 2.2011]
  • Brettell, Caroline B. 2008. “Migration Theory. Talking across Disciplines”, in: Brettell, Caroline B./Hollifield, James F. (eds.): Migration Theory. Talking Across Disciplines. New York/London: Routledge, 1-29.
  • Brettell, Caroline B. 2008. “Theorizing Migration in Anthropogy. The Social Construction of Networks, Identities, Communities, and Globalscapes”, in: Brettell, Caroline B./ Hollifield, James F. (eds.): Migration Theory. Talking Across Disciplines. New York/London: Routledge, 113-120.
  • Bunzl, Matti. 2005. “Between anti-Semitism and Islamophobia: Some thoughts on new Europe”, in: American Ethnologist 32/4, 499-508.
  • Butratana Kosita/ Trupp, Alexander. 2011. “Thai Communities in Vienna. „in: ASEAS –Austrian Journal of South- East Asian Studies, 4(1), 180-190.
  • Fassman, Heinz/Reger Ursula. 2008. “Austria: From Guest Worker Migration to a Country of Immigration”, IDEA Working Papers No. 1, Dec 2008. URL.: http://www.idea6fp.uw.edu.pl/pliki/WP1_Austria.pdf [Retrieved 5. 2.2011]
  • Gingrich, Andre. 1998. “Frontier Myths of Orientalism. The Muslim World in Public and Popular Cultures of Central Europe”, in: Baskar, Bojan/ Brumen, Borut (eds.): Mess: Mediterranean Ethnological Summer School, Piran, Pirano, Slovenia 1996 Vol. 2. Ljubljana: Inštitut za multikulturne raziskave, 99-127.
  • Givens, Terri. 2007. “Immigrant Integration in Europe: Empirical Research”. In: Annual Review of Political Science 10, 67-83.
  • Gupta, Akhil/ Ferguson, James. 1992. “Beyond “Culture”: Space, Identity, and the politics of Difference”, in: Cultural Anthropology 7/1, 6-23.
  • Hall, Stuart. 2009. Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices. London: Sage, 223-291.
  • Heath, Anthony/Rothan Catherine/Kilpi, Elina. 2008. “The Second Generation in Western Europe: Education, Unemployment, and Occupational Attainment”, in: Annual Review of Sociology 34, 211-235.
  • Horevitz, Elisabeth. 2009. “Understanding the Anthropology of Immigration and Migration”, in: Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment. Volume 19, Issue 6, 745 – 758.
  • Kearney, Michael. 1986. “From the Invisible Hand to Visible Feet. Anthropological Studies of Migration and Development”, in: Annual Review of Anthropology 15, 331-361.
  • Kearney, Michael. 1995. “The local and the global: The Anthropology of Globalization and Transnationalism”, in: Annual Review of Anthropology 24, 547-565.
  • Kraler, Albert/ Stacher, Irene. 2002. "Migration Dynamics in Austria: Patterns and Policies in the 19th and 20th century" in: Historische Sozialkunde. Geschichte-Fachdidaktik-Politische Bildung, Special Issue 2002, International Migration, pp.51-65.
  • Krzyzanowski, Michal/Wodak Ruth 2008. Debating Migration in Austria. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Press, (selected readings).
  • Koser, Khalid. 2007. International Migration. A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press, 1-16.
  • Levitt, Peggy and Jaworsky Nadya. 2007. “Transnational Migration Studies: Past Developments and Future Trends”, in Annual Review of Sociology 33, 129-15.
  • Lindo, Flip. 2005. “The concept of integration. Theoretical concerns and practical meaning”, in: Fronseca Lucinda, Maria/ Malheiros, Jorge (eds.): Social integration and Mobility: education, housing & health. IMISCOE Cluster B5-State of the Art Report. Lisbon: CEG, 7-18.
  • Mahler, Sarah J./ Pessar Patricia R. 2009. “Gender Matters. Ethnographers bring gender from the periphery toward the core of migration studies”, in: Six-Hohenbalken, Maria/ Tošić, Jelena (eds.): Anthropologie der Migration. Theoretische Grundlagen und interdisziplinäre Aspekte. Wien: Facultas.wuv, 205-228.
  • Pedraza, Silvia. 1991. “Women and Migration: The Social Consequence of Gender”, in: Annual Review of Sociology. Volume 17, Issue 10, 1991, 303-325
  • Perchinig, Bernhard. 2007. “Migration in Austria”, in: Overhaus, Marco/Maull, Hanns W. and Harnisch, Sebastian (eds.): Foreign Policy in Dialogue Volume 8, Issue 22, May 2007, 25-33. URL.: http://www.deutsche-aussenpolitik.de/newsletter/issue22.pdf [Retrieved 5. 2.2011]
  • Pettigrew, Thomas. 1998. “Reactions towards the New Minorities of Western Europe”, in: Annual Review of Sociology 24, 77-103.
  • Pine, Francis. 2003. “Gender”, in: Barnard, Alan/Spencer, Jonathan (eds.): Encyclopedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology. New York: Routledge, 253-261.
  • Pollack, David C., and Van Reken, Ruth E. 2001. Third Culture Kids: The Experience of Growing Up Among Worlds. Yarmouth: Intercultural Press, 6-20.
  • Schultz, Emily A./Lavenda, Robert H. 2008. “Anthropology in History and the explanation of Cultural Diversity”, in: Schultz, Emily A./Lavenda, Robert H. (eds.): Cultural Anthropology. A perspective on the Human Condition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 65-85.
  • Schultz, Emily A./Lavenda, Robert H. 2008. “Dimensions of Inequality in the Contemporary World: Class, Caste, Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism”, in: Schultz, Emily A./Lavenda, Robert H. (eds.): Cultural Anthropology. A perspective on the Human Condition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 327-355.
  • Silverstein, Paul A. 2005. “Immigrant Racialization and the New Savage Slot: Race, Migration, and Immigration in the New Europe”, in: Annual Review of Anthropology 34, 363-384.
  • Strasser, Sabine/Kroner, Gudrun/Herzog-Punzenberger, Barbara. 2009. “From Margin to Mainstream? Migration Studies and Social Anthropology in Austria”, in: Six-Hohenbalken, Maria/Tošić, Jelena (eds.): Anthropologie der Migration. Theoretische Grundlagen und interdisziplinäre Aspekte. Wien: Facultas.wuv, 127-142.
  • Vertovek, Stevan. 2009. Transnationalism. New York: Routledge, 1-20.
  • Watkins, Francis. 2003. “Migration”, in: Barnard, Alan/Spencer, Jonathan (eds.): Encyclopedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology. New York: Routledge, 370-371.
  • World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous People. URL.: http://www.minorityrights.org/?lid=1879#current [Retrieved 5. 2.2011]