Comparative Austrian and European Youth Cultures: Theories and Practices

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Course Information
Discipline(s): 
Anthropology
Sociology
Terms offered: 
Fall
Credits: 
3
Language of instruction: 
English
Contact Hours: 
45
Prerequisites: 

Previous course in social science is recommended, though not required.

Additional student cost: 

None

Description: 

The course on youth culture covers youth culture theories, history of Austrian youth culture, as well as insights in selected youth cultures of Europe today, based on young people’s changing life worlds. We will explore and analyze youth cultural activities, forms of expression and trends from a sociological perspective through lectures, discussions, and excursions.

Attendance policy: 

IES Abroad Vienna requires attendance at all class sessions, including field study excursions, internship meetings, scheduled rehearsals, and exams. Attendance will be monitored and unexcused absences will affect the student’s grade via the “Participation” component of each course’s final grade.

Learning outcomes: 

By the end of the course, students will have gained:

  • basic knowledge of youth cultural theories
  • specific knowledge of Austrian youth cultures and basic knowledge of European youth cultures
  • basic knowledge of young people’s life worlds in a changing social and economic environment
Method of presentation: 

Lectures, student presentations, discussions, film viewing and excursions

Required work and form of assessment: 

There will be a midterm and a final exam. The students are expected to prepare between lessons, to present in class and to participate in class. Additionally, they have to provide a shorter written analysis on a contemporary youth culture of their own choice (3-5 pages). The course is graded as follows:

  • Midterm exam - 30%
  • Final exam - 40%
  • Shorter written analysis - 10%
  • Class participation - 10%
  • Presentation in class - 10%
content: 
Session Content Required readings
1 Course Introduction    Theories of Youth: Changing life circumstances for young people.  School-work-transition, Socialization, Social Inequalities, Identity    Presentation Manfred Zentner
  • Giddens, A. (2006). Sociology, Chapter 6: Socialization, The Life-Course and Ageing, pp. 161-201
  • Furlong, A., & Cartmel, F. (1997). Young People and Social Change. Individualization and risk in late modernity, Chapter 1: The risk society (pp. 1 –10), Chapter 3: Social change and labour market transitions (pp. 27–39) 
  • Bennett, A. (2009). As young as you feel: Youth as a discursive construct, pp.23-36
2 History of Youth Culture Part I: The Emergence and Rise of Youth Subculture (when and how did modern youth culture emerge, youth culture under different preconditions and throughout the 20th century).   Methods of research    Formation of groups for own research   Presentation Manfred Zentner
  • Willis, Paul (1978): Profane Culture (212 p.)
3 History of Youth Culture Part II:  Screening of “Teenage” (USA 2013), directed by Matt Wolf, based on the book by Jon Savage “Teenage: the creation of Youth 1845-1945”.   Discussion and group work

 

4 History of Youth Culture Part III: Sociology of the Gang and Youth Subcultural Studies
  • Whyte, W. F. (1943). Street Corner Society, Chapters: Introduction and Part I “Corner Boys and College Boys”
  • Shildrick, T., & MacDonald, R. (2006). In Defence of Subculture, pp.125-140
5

Midterm Exam

 

6 Theory of Youth Culture: From Counterculture to Subculture -  from Subculture to Fashion Lifestyle - Scenes - Identity
  • Pohl, A., & Walther, A. (2007). Activating the disadvantaged, pp. 533-553
  • Hodkinson, P. (2009). Youth Cultures: A Critical Outline of Key Debates, pp.1-21
7 European Youth Cultures in the 21st Century: Music oriented youth cultures
  • Muggleton, D. (2005). From Classlessness to Clubculture, pp. 205-219
  • O’Hara, Craig (1999). The Philosophy of Punk: More than a Noise. (pp. 8-25; 28-32; 34-43; 56-80; 84-95; 113-118; 132-140)
  • Schilt, K. (2004). “Riot Grrrl Is …”: The Contestation over Meaning in a Music Scene. pp. 115–130 
  • Brill, D. (2009). Gender, status and subcultural capital in the goth scene, pp. 111-125
  • Reitsamer, R. (2011). The DYI Careers of Techno and Drum’n’Bass DJs in Vienna, pp. 28-43
8 European youth cultures in the 21st century: Sports and body culture Youth cultures and their role for migrant youth   Group work on own research
  • McRobbie, A., & Garber, J. (1991). Girls and Subcultures. pp.12–25
9 European youth cultures in the 21st century: music oriented youth cultures   Excursion (Arena or Flex) meeting at 19:30 TBC

 

10 European youth cultures in the 21st century: computer- and media oriented youth cultures     Youth cultures and protest   Discussing next weeks' presentations of own youth research
  • Livingstone, S. (2002). Young People and New Media, pp.1-29; 119-165
  • Cuconato, M., Waechter, N. (2012). The interplay of youth culture, the Web 2.0 and political participation in Europe. New reflections after the Youth Quake in Northern Africa and the Middle East, pp. 143-158
11 Students’ presentations of own youth research (group 2 + group 3)  
12

Final Exam

 

 

Required readings: 
  • Bennett, A. (2009). As young as you feel: Youth as a discursive construct, pp.23-36
  • Brill, D. (2009). Gender, status and subcultural capital in the goth scene, pp. 111-125
  • Cuconato, M., Waechter, N. (2012). The interplay of youth culture, the Web 2.0 and political participation in Europe. New reflections after the Youth Quake in Northern Africa and the Middle East, pp. 143-158
  • Furlong, A., & Cartmel, F. (1997). Young People and Social Change. Individualization and risk in late modernity, Chapter 1: The risk society (pp. 1 –10), Chapter 3: Social change and labour market transitions (pp. 27–39) 
  • Giddens, A. (2006). Sociology, Chapter 6: Socialization, The Life-Course and Ageing, pp. 161-201
  • Hodkinson, P. (2009). Youth Cultures: A Critical Outline of Key Debates, pp.1-21
  • Livingstone, S. (2002). Young People and New Media, pp.1-29; 119-165
  • McRobbie, A., & Garber, J. (1991). Girls and Subcultures. pp.12–25
  • Muggleton, D. (2005). From Classlessness to Clubculture, pp. 205-219
  • O’Hara, Craig (1999). The Philosophy of Punk: More than a Noise. (pp. 8-25; 28-32; 34-43; 56-80; 84-95; 113-118; 132-140)
  • Pohl, A., & Walther, A. (2007). Activating the disadvantaged, pp. 533-553
  • Reitsamer, R. (2011). The DYI Careers of Techno and Drum’n’Bass DJs in Vienna, pp. 28-43
  • Schilt, K. (2004). “Riot Grrrl Is …”: The Contestation over Meaning in a Music Scene. pp. 115–130 
  • Shildrick, T., & MacDonald, R. (2006). In Defence of Subculture, pp.125-140
  • Whyte, W. F. (1943). Street Corner Society, Chapters: Introduction and Part I “Corner Boys and College Boys”
  • Willis, Paul (1978): Profane Culture (212 p.)