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Course Information
Discipline(s): 
Cultural Studies
African Studies
Terms offered: 
Fall, Spring
Credits: 
3
Language of instruction: 
English
Prerequisites: 

None

Additional student cost: 

None

Contact Hours: 
45
Description: 

This interdisciplinary course examines the multifaceted dynamics of North African Identities in the context of the region’s close links with Europe, the Middle East, and Sub-Saharan Africa. It focuses on the ways ethnicity, language, religion, and gender affect both the cultural and political dynamics and how people, reject, adapt, assimilate, and construct their identities. Readings will cover Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt.

Attendance policy: 

Class attendance is compulsory. Each student will be allowed only two unexcused absences throughout the course. For each unexcused absence beyond this there will be a reduction in the final grade. Students who are late to class on a regular basis will also receive a reduction in their final grade and/or disciplinary action.

Students should not exceed 2 absences in each (45 hours) content course.
Students should not exceed 4 absences in the (90 hours) Arabic language course.

Any additional absence would lower the grades as follows:
1 more absence = will lower the final grade by 5 %
2 more absences= will lower the final grade by 10 %
3 more absences = will lower the grade by 15 %
4 more absences = will lower the grade by 20 %

Any additional absences will continue to lower the final grade by 5% increments. 

Learning outcomes: 

By the end of the course, students are able to:

  • Discuss the cultural identities in the North African context.
  • Identify the ways in which cultural identities are politically charged and hotly contested in the current global context;
  • Produce creative and original responses to problems and issues related to the North African Cultural space.
Method of presentation: 

A combination of lectures, discussions, seminar format, case studies, student presentations, field visits to related institutions/museums. 

Required work and form of assessment: 
  • Completion of readings; assignments and active participation - 10%
  • Two Essays - 15% total
  • Midterm Evaluation - 15%
  • Final Exam - 30%
  • Research paper and report - 30%
    • Research term paper (10-15 pages) - 15%
    • Oral report (a formal assignment) - 15%

Two Essays

  • Essay 1: Reaction paper: On the basis of the readings assigned, and the Class discussions, the students should analyze the issues addressed and provide a personal view. Students should support their claims with concrete facts and examples from the readings and class discussions. (Less than 450 words.)
  • Essay 2: first draft of the research paper which should serve as a background for research. A literature review, an approach and method, Qualitative/Quantitative, surveys, interviews.

Research Paper and Report
With a focus on the issue of identity, the student should choose a topic that will help him/her to find out about the identity/identities claimed by Moroccans and /or North African people in relation to their gender, age, level of education, educational system, ethnic group, socio-economic status, etc. The students could orient and relate the research topic to his/her major. The research should involve fieldwork and a clearly defined methodology.

  • Oral presentation of the findings (<5-8> min presentation)
  • Written report (< 6-12 pages) (submission: last class meeting)
content: 
Week Topic Content
1

A Historical Overview of North Africa

  • History of North Africa Timeline  / A brief History of North Africa
  • Joseph Galbo. Review Essay of Albert Memmi. Decolonization and the Decolonized. Canadian Journal of Sociology Online. March-April 2007.
  • Kay, Deaux. Social Identity. In Encycopedia of Women and Gender, Volumes One and Two. 2001 by Academic Press, pp.1 -9.
2

Language and the Construction of North African Identities

  • Sirles, Craig A. Politics and Arabisation: The Evolution of Post independence North Africa. In Int’l. J. Soc. Lan. 137 (1999), pp. 115-129. Walter de Druyter.
  • Dawn Marley. From Monolingualism to Multilingualism: Recent Changes in Moroccan Language Policy. In Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Bilingualism. James Cohen, Kara T. McAlister, Kellie Rolstad, and Jeff MacSwan, (Eds.). Dawn Marley. 2005, pp.1487-1500. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.
  • Crawford, David. Royal Interest in Local Culture: The Politics and Potential of Morocco’s Imazighen. In Maya Shatzmiller (Ed.) Nationalism and Minority Identities in Islamic Societies. Montreal: McGill-Queens University Press. Pp. 164-194. 2005.
3

Conceptualizing North Africa

  • Abdullatif, Ali (Ed.). Introduction. In Beyond Colonialism & Nationalism in the Maghreb: History, Culture, Politics. London: Palgrave, 2000. P1-12.
  • Tobolka, Radim. Gellner and Geertz in Morocco: A Segmentary Debate. In Social Evolution & History, Vol. 2 No. 2, September 2003 88–117.  ‘Uchitel’ Publishing House
4

Arabs and Amazighs (Berbers)

  • Ben Abdeljelil Jameleddine. The Discourse of Identity in the Maghreb between Difference and Universality. In  IRIE International Review of Information Ethics Vol.7, www.i-r-i-e.net, (09/2007)  pp.1614-1687.
  • Crawford, David and Katherine E. Hoffman. Essentially Amazigh: Urban Berbers and the Global Village. In Kevin Lacey (Ed).  The Arab-African and Islamic World Interdisciplinary  Studies. New York: Peter Lang. , pp. 117-131.
  • Maddy-Weitzman, Bruce. Ethno-politics and Globalization in North Africa: The Berber Culture Movement. In Journal of North African Studies Vol. 11, N° 1, March 2006. Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Field trip: Visit to The Royal Institute of the Amazigh Culture (IRCAM).
5 Cultural Authoritarianism
  • Hammoudi, Abdellah. Master and Disciple: The Cultural Foundations of Moroccan Authoritarianism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 1997. In Islamic Law and Society, vol. 10, N° 1.
  • Bourquia, Rahma. The Shadow of the Sultan. In Bourquia, Rahma et al (Eds.) The Shadow of the Sultan Culture, Power, and Politics in Morocco. Cambridge: Harvard Center fo Middle East Studies, 1999, pp. 243-258.  
6

Identity Politics and Social Movements 

  • Azza Karam.Transnational Political Islam. In Azza Karam (Ed.). Transnational Political Islam: Religion, Ideology and Power. Pluto Press. 2004, pp. 1-27.   
  • Amghar, Samir. Political Islam in Morocco. CEPS Working Document No. 269/June 2007. Center for European Policy Studies. CEPS Thinking Ahead fro Europe.  website (http://www.ceps.be). 2007, pp. 1-13.
  • Burgat François & Dowell William. Religion and the Construction of Identity in North Africa. 1993, pp. 1-41
7 Review & Midterm Exam  
8 Gender and the Construction of North African Identities
  • Moghadam, Valentine M.. Gender, National Identity and Citizenship: Reflections on the Middle East and North Africa. In Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East. 1999, Vol. XIX No. , pp. 137-156.
  • Naciri,  Rabéa . The Women Movement and Political Discourse in Morocco.  Occasional Paper 8, March 1998. United Nations Research Institute for Social Development United Nations Development Programme, pp. 1-34.
  • Ross, Michael L. Oil, Islam, and Women. In American Political Science Review. Vol. 102, N° 1, February 2008. 
9

The Politics of Memory

  • Loudiy, Fedoua. Facing a Bloody Past: Transitional justice: A Historical  and Conceptual Framework, pp.393-423.
  • Smith, A. R. & Loudiy, F. (2005). Testing the red lines: On the liberalization of speech in Morocco.Human Rights Quarterly 27(3), 1069-1119.
  • Field trip: Visit to Moroccan National Council for Human Rights (CNDH). http://www.cndh.org.ma./?lang=en
10

Art and the Construction of North African Identities

  • El Hamel, Chouki. Constructing A Diasporic Identity: Tracing the Origins of the Gnawa Spiritual Group In Morocco. In Journal of African History, 49 (2008), pp. 241–60. 2008.  Cambridge University Press.
  • Bentahar, Ziad. The Visibility of African Identity in Moroccan Music. Online publication date: 12 February 2010, pp. 1-9. Wasafiri Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t716100725.
  • Kapchan, Deborah. Gnawa and Transglobal Trance: The Medium is the Music. Volume 46, N° 1 Expedition.  2007, pp. 30-37. WWW. MUSEUM UPENN.EDU/PBLICATION.
11

Modernity, New Global Arrangements and North African Cultural Identities

  • Ossman, Susan. Three Faces of Beauty: Casablanca, Paris, Cairo. Durham: Duke University Press. 2002, pp.14-170.
  • Chouikha, Larbi. Satellite Television in the Maghreb: Plural Reception and Interference of Identities.  In History and Anthropology, Vol. 18, N° 3, 2007, pp.367-377
  • Bennett, Clinton. Muslims and Modernity. London: Continuum. 2005, pp. 63-84.  
12 Review and Final Exam  

 

Required readings: 
  • Abdullatif, Ali (Ed.). Introduction. Beyond Colonialism & Nationalism in the Maghreb: History, Culture, Politics. London: Palgrave, 2000. P1-12.
  • Arieff, Alexis. Morocco: Current Issues. Analyst in African Affairs. Congressional Research Service 7-5700. CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress. www.crs.gov RS21579. December 20, 2011.
  • Amghar, Samir. Political Islam in Morocco. CEPS Working Document No. 269/June 2007. Center for European Policy Studies. CEPS Thinking Ahead fro Europe.  website (http://www.ceps.be). 2007, pp. 1-13
  • Bayat, Asef and Martijn de Koning. The Making of Youth Moslems. ISIM Review 16/Autunm 2005; Marloes Janson; Islam in Africa.  ISIM Review 16/Autunm 2005, pp 1-2.
  • Azza Karam. Transnational Political Islam. In Azza Karam (Ed.). Transnational Political Islam: Religion, Ideology and Power. Pluto Press. 2004, pp. 1-27.  
  • Ben Abdeljelil Jameleddine. The Discourse of Identity in the Maghreb between Difference and Universality. In  IRIE International Review of Information Ethics Vol.7, www.i-r-i-e.net, (09/2007)  pp.1614-1687.
  • Bennett, Clinton. Muslims and Modernity. London: Continuum, 2005.
  • Bentahar, Ziad. The Visibility of African Identity in Moroccan Music. Online publication date: 12 February 2010, pp. 1-9. Wasafiri Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t716100725
  • Bentahar, Ziad. Continental Drift: The Disjunction of North and Sub-Saharan Africa. In Research in African Literatures, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Spring 2011). © 2011, pp. 1-14.
  • Bourqia, Rahma, et.al (Eds). In The Shadow of the Sultan.  In The Shadow of the Sultan: Culture, Power, and Politics in Morocco. Cambridge: Harvard Center for Middle East Studies, 1999 , pp. 243-258. 
  • Chouikha, Larbi. Satellite Television in the Maghreb: Plural Reception and Interference of Identities.  In History and Anthropology, Vol. 18, N° 3, 2007, pp.367-377.
  • Daisy Hilse Dwyer. Images and Self-Image. 1978, pp. 39-60.
  • Crawford, David and Katherine E. Hoffman. Essentially Amazigh: Urban Berbers and the Global Village. In. Kevin Lacey. (Ed).  The Arab-African and Islamic World Interdisciplinarv  Studies. New York: Peter Lang. , pp. 117-131.
  • Crawford, David. Royal Interest in Local Culture: The Politics and Potential of Morocco’s Imazighen” in Nationalism and Minority Identities in Islamic Societies, (Ed.) Maya Shatzmiller. Montreal: McGill-Queens University Press. Pp. 164-194. 2005.
  • Dawn, Marley. From Monolingualism to Multilingualism: Recent Changes in Moroccan Language Policy.In Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Bilingualism. James Cohen, Kara T. McAlister, Kellie Rolstad, and Jeff MacSwan, (Eds.). Dawn Marley. 2005, pp.1487-1500. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.
  • Deborah Kapchan. Nostalgia in Contemporary Moroccan Poetry. http://www.arteeast.org/pages/artnews/article/129 .
  • Duclos, Jean Louis. The Berbers and the Rise of Moroccan Nationalism. In Arabs and Berbers from Tribe to Nation in North Africa. (Eds.), Gellner, Ernest and Charles Micaud. London: Duckworth, 1973, pp. 4-13.
  • Dunwoodie, Peter. Assimilation, Cultural Identity, and Permissible Deviance. In  Lorcin Patricia M. E. (Ed.)  Algeria & France, 1800-2000: Identity, Memory, Nostalgia. 2006. Syracuse University Press, New York.
  • Echchaibi, Nabil. (Be)Longing Media: Minority Radio Between Cultural Retention And Renewal. In The Public. Vol. 9, 2002, pp 37-50.
  • El Hamel, Chouki. Constructing A Diasporic Identity: Tracing The Origins of the Gnawa Spiritual Group In Morocco. In Journal of African History, 49. Cambridge UP.2008,pp.241–60.  
  • Fuller, Graham E. The Youth Crisis in Middle Eastern Society. Institute for Social Policy and Understanding. Clinton Township, Michigan. 2004, pp.2-13.
  • Galbo, Joseph. Review Essay of Albert Memmi. Decolonization and the Decolonized. Canadian Journal of Sociology Online. March-April 2007.
  • Gellner, Ernest and Charles Micaud (eds.). Arabs and Berbers From Tribe to Nation in North Africa. Eds. London: Duckworth, 1973.
  • Hammoudi, Abdellah. Master and Disciple: The Cultural Foundations of Moroccan Authoritarianism.Chicago: Univ of Chicago Press. 97. In Islamic Law and Society, V. 10, N° 1.
  • Hart, David Montgomery. Conflicting Models of a Berber Tribal Structure in the Moroccan Rif : the Segmentary and Alliance System of the Aith Varyaghar. In Revue de l'Occident Musulman et de la Méditerranée, N°7, 1970. pp. 93-99.
  • Hart, David Montgomery. Faulty Models of North African and Middle Eastern Tribal Structures. In Revue du Monde Musulman et de la Méditerranée, N°68-69, 1993. pp. 225-238.
  • Joffe, E.G.H and C.R. Pennell (Eds). Tribe and State essays in honour of David Montgomerry Hart. Wisbech: Menas Press, 1991.
  • Kapchan, Deborah. Gnawa and Transglobal Trance: The Medium is the Music. Volume 46, N° 1 Expedition..  2007, pp. 30-37. WWW. MUSEUM UPENN.EDU/PBLICATION.
  • Kapchan, Deborah. Traveling Spirit Masters: Moroccan Gnawa Trance and Music in the Global Marketplace. Wesleyan, 2007.
  • Lalami, Laila. Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits. Chapel Hill: Alonquin Books, 2005.
  • Loudiy, Fedoua. “Facing a Bloody Past: Transitional justice: A Historical  and Conceptual Framework. Pp.393-423.
  • Mernissi, Fatema. Dreams of Trespass. Reading, Mass: Persus, 1994.
  • Moghadam, Valentine M. Gender, National Identity and Citizenship: Reflections on the Middle East and North Africa. In Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 1999, Vol. XIX No. , pp. 137-156.
  • Naciri,  Rabéa . The Women’s Movement and Political Discourse in Morocco.  Occasional Paper 8, March 1998. United Nations Research Institute for Social Development  United Nations Development Programme, pp. 1-34.
  • Oliver, Roland Anthony and Fage, J.D. A Short History of Africa.  Penguin Books: London and New York, N.Y., U.S.A. 1988, 6th edition.
  • Ossman, Susan. Three Faces of Beauty: Casablanca, Paris, Cairo. Durham: Duke University Press, 2002.
  • Philips, James. Revolutionary Islam in Algeria. In The Backgrounder Heritage Foundation. 1995, Volume 9, N° 1060.
  • Sirles, Craig A. Politics and Arabisation: The Evolution of Postindependence North Africa. In Int’l. J. Soc. Lan. 137 (1999), pp. 115-129. Walter de Druyter.
  • Straubhaar, Joseph D. Global, Hybrid or Multiple? Cultural Identities In the Age of Satellite TV and the Internet. In Plenary I. Global, Hybrid or Multiple? In Nordicom-Information 4-2008. NordMedia 2007. Redaktör: Ulla Carlsson.2008, 375 p., (Nordicom Information).
  • Tufte, Thomas. Exploring Cultural Globalization. New Forms of Experience and Citizen-driven Change Processes. ? In Nordicom-Information 4-2008. NordMedia 2007. Redaktör: Ulla Carlsson.2008, 375 p., (Nordicom Information).
  • Tobolka, Radim. Gellner and Geertz in Morocco: A Segmentary Debate. In Social Evolution & History, Vol. 2 No. 2, September 2003 88–117.  ‘Uchitel’ Publishing House
  • Waterbury, John. Bargaining for Segmentarity, in Tribe and State; Essays in honour of David Montgomerry Hart. (Eds.) Joffe, E.G.H & C.R Pennell. Wisbech: Menas Press, 1991. pp. 4-13.
  • Women's Rights in the Arab World. Overview of the Status of Women in Family Law with Special Reference to the Influence of Islamic Factors.  Published by: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH Postfach 5180, 65726 Eschborn Internet: http://www.gtz.de.