Beginning Italian I

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Course Information
Discipline(s): 
Italian
Terms offered: 
Summer
Credits: 
3
Language of instruction: 
Italian
Contact Hours: 
45
Prerequisites: 

None.

Additional student cost: 

None.

Description: 

This course is designed to meet the needs of beginner students participating in a study abroad program.  The course will introduce the students to the most frequent everyday situations to facilitate their ability to communicate and function in a new environment. Grammar and vocabulary will always be presented, analyzed and practiced in a context which is meaningful to the students. Oral skills will be emphasized while a grounding in grammar will consolidate the understanding and use of the language structures.  Vocabulary is based on everyday situations. 

Student Profile:
This course is designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of Italian. By the end of the course, students will develop a basic foundation in the five skills: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening, and speaking to accomplish a variety of basic everyday needs in the Italian culture as described in the learning outcomes below.

Attendance policy: 

Regular class attendance is mandatory. Students are expected to attend classes each day.

IES Abroad Milano allows a maximum of TWO excused absences per course, to be used for emergencies related to health, family, religion. Each further absence will automatically result in a penalty of 2 point off (2/100) on the final grade. Please note that this rule does not apply to exams: failure to attend your midterm and/or final exam will automatically result in an F grade on that paper/exam. SEVEN absences per course will result in a failing grade (2 excused absences included). Furthermore, absence on the date of scheduled tests, presentations or quizzes does not entitle to recover/reschedule such tests. If using absences for travel, students must be aware that they may remain with no excusable absence in case of illness.

Learning outcomes: 

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve some of the outcomes for the Novice Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

  1. Intercultural Communication

    1. Students will be able to meet basic everyday needs using verbal communication, use compensatory strategies when they do not know the word or expression (repetition, body language, etc.), and identify some basic nonverbal communication strategies.
    2. Students will be able to recognize basic appropriate and inappropriate expressions and behaviors in the host language.
    3. Students will be able to distinguish between basic representations of formality and informality in the language.
    4. Students will understand that there may be differences between cultural stereotypes and generalizations between the home culture and host culture.
  2. Listening
    1. Students will be able to understand basic statements, requests, descriptions, and questions in specific cultural context relevant to them (hosts’ interactions, Center interactions, studying, shopping, transportation, meals).
    2. Students will be able to use context to understand the gist of some basic spoken language they overhear, including the media, conversations between others, and announcements.
  3. Speaking
    1. Students will be able to use some basic phrases appropriately in some everyday situations (home, the IES Abroad Center, the community).
    2. Students will be able to express some basic needs by asking questions, and get what they need in uncomplicated, everyday situations.
  4. Reading
    1. Students will be able to identify and understand basic sentences.
    2. Students will be able to interpret main ideas in short passages and news headlines, but their understanding is often limited to the words or groups of words that they have seen in class.
  5. Writing
    1. With limited accuracy, students will be able to write short sentences and short paragraphs about basic and concrete topics they have studied, such as themselves, their families, their friends, their likes and dislikes, and their daily routines.
    2. Students will be able to send basic emails, text messages, postcards, and online posts, and fill out some basic forms.
Method of presentation: 

Classes are taught with a communicative approach to facilitate students' ability to use their own resources and to develop confidence and familiarity with the target language. The instructor will lead the students through the process of learning using various techniques. Working in pairs or small groups is especially emphasized. Starting from the first week and throughout the rest of the course students will be assigned various "on site" interactive activities, to encourage them to use the language in practical situations, to interact with locals and with their Italian student companions in order to find out about Italian lifestyle and culture. The instructor will use task-based field trips and class activities to make the students aware of the strong relationship between language and culture. For this purpose the instructor will reinforce students’ independence by providing them historic and cultural background before they go on field trips.

Required work and form of assessment: 

Exclusive use of Italian language in class, active participation in all class activities, homework, research regularly completed as indicated by the instructor, oral and written tests and exams, attendance and punctuality. Students will be required to enter the Moodle course page on a regular basis in order to access readings, exercises, and any other regular and extra material.

  • Class participation, engagement and homework (including field studies and use of the online Moodle page) – 20 %
  • Listening comprehension (2 quizzes) – 10 % each – 20 %
  • Oral exam – 15 %
  • Midterm exam – 15 %
  • Video assignment – 10 %
  • Final exam – 20 %

 

content: 
 
Week Content Assignment Corresponding Learning Outcome(s)
Week 1 & 2

(June 5,8,10,12)

  1. Functional: asking questions, introducing yourself
  2. Grammatical: alphabet, numbers, to be, to have, pronunciation, definite and indefinite articles, gender and number of nouns and adjectives
  3. Vocabulary: basic everyday vocabulary, and most famous Italian words and expressions (focus on food)
  4. Culture: Il bar italiano // Field Study “EXPO DAY” –Saturday 13th

  

  • T.A. Unit 1
  • Q.E. Unit 1
  • Exercises to practice on formulating first questions, and basic structures useful for elementary conversations in everyday situations.
Ia, IIa, IIIa, IIIb, IVa, Va
Week 3 (June 15, 17) (June 16: Activity Summer Program - Prof. Marangione)
  1. Functional: talking about yourself, descriptions
  2. Grammatical: present tense
  3. Vocabulary: personality adjectives/hobbies
  4. Culture: Famous Italians
  • T.A. Unit 2
  • Q.E. Unit 2
  • Excersises to practice on verbs and different actions, and to describe people, things and places.
  • Listening Comprehension 1: Wednesday 17th
Ia, Ib, Ic, IIIa, IIIb, IVa, Va
Week 4 (June 22, 24) (June 23: Activity Summer Program - Prof. Fontana)
  1. Functional: asking and giving directions
  2. Grammatical: prepositions
  3. Vocabulary: jobs
  4. Culture: getting around Milan
  • T.A. Unit 3
  • Q.E. Unit 3
  • Describing actions and everyday activities.
  • MIDTERM: Wednesday, 24th
Ia, Ib, Ic, IIIa, IIIb, IVa, Va  
Week 5 (June 29, July 1) (June 30: Activity Summer Program - Prof. Marangione)
  1. Functional: asking and giving directions
  2. Grammatical: prepositions
  3. Vocabulary: jobs
  4. Culture: getting around Milan
  • T.A. Unit 3
  • Q.E. Unit 3
  • Exercises on useful vocabulary for going shopping or on holyday.
  • Oral Exam 1: Wednesday 1st
Ib, Ic, IIb, IIIa, IIIb, IVa, Va, Vb
Week 6 (July 6, 8) (July 7: Activity Summer Program - Prof. Fontana)
  1. Functional: talking about our family, talking about past events
  2. Grammatical: introduction to present perfect, possessive adjectives
  3. Vocabulary: family
  4. Culture: Italian cinema
  • T.A. Unit 4
  • Q.E. Unit 4
  • Introducing the difference between everyday actions and specific events in the past
Ia, Ib, Ic, Id, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb, IVa, Va, Vb
Week 7 (July 13, 15) (July 14: FINAL EXAM SUMMER PROGRAM) (Video assignment to upload on Moodle - deadline: Wednesday 15th)
  1. Functional: Talking about past events
  2. Grammatical: present perfect
  3. Vocabulary: schedules, leisure and hobbies
  4. Culture: field study Triennale - Wednesday 15th
  • T.A. Unit 8
  • Q.E. Unit 8
  • Exercises to reinforce the description of past events.
  • Listening Comprehension 2: Monday 13th
Ia, Ib, Ic, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb, IVb, Va, Vb
Week 8 (July 20, 22)
  1. Functional: going shopping
  2. Grammatical: review of prepositions and verbs
  3. Vocabulary: Clothing
  4. Culture: field study La Rinascente – Wednesday 22nd

 

  • T.A. Unit 5
  • Q.E. Unit 5
  • Exercises on useful vocabulary for gonig shopping.
Ia, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb, IVa, IVb, Va, Vb

Week 9
(July 27, 28)

General Review
  • FINAL EXAM: Wednesday 29th
 

T.A. = P. Bacci – G. Zambardino, Un Tuffo nell’Azzurro 1. Nuovo corso di lingua e cultura italiana, Panozzo editore
Q.E. = P. Bacci, Quaderno degli Esercizi. Un Tuffo nell’Azzurro 1, Panozzo Editore.

Required readings: 
  • * P. Bacci – G. Zambardino, Un Tuffo nell’Azzurro 1. Nuovo corso di lingua e cultura italiana, Panozzo editore
  • ** P. Bacci, Quaderno degli Esercizi. Un Tuffo nell’Azzurro 1, Panozzo Editore.