Principles of Marketing Management

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Course Information
Discipline(s): 
International Business
Terms offered: 
Fall, Spring
Credits: 
3
Language of instruction: 
English
Contact Hours: 
45
Prerequisites: 

None

Additional student cost: 

None

Description: 

The marketing function is an essential part of almost every large business enterprise. To be effective, senior business managers and leaders must understand how marketing activities are connected to overall organizational performance, and any professional who works within the marketing function must master that discipline’s key concepts, analytic tools and processes.  This course provides students with an introduction to the central elements of marketing management.  In particular, we will consider 1) the basic concepts of marketing; 2) the role of the marketing function within the overall business enterprise; 3) the various activities necessary for effective marketing planning (including an analysis of cross-cultural and environmental factors that impact international operations); and 4) key issues of strategy, implementation and marketing management relevant to a firm’s long-term success.  The primary objective of the course is to provide students who are interested in business with the introductory knowledge and skills that they will need to move into professional roles, whether in the marketing function or another discipline.  At the same time, the course aims to improve the overall critical thinking and communication skills that students will need in order to succeed in any organization or field.

Attendance policy: 

Regular class attendance is mandatory. Students are expected to attend classes each day, including course-related excursions.

IES Abroad Milano allows a maximum of TWO excused absences per semester. Each further absence will automatically result in a penalty of two points off (2/100) on the final grade. SEVEN absences per course (including 2 excused absences) will result in a failing grade for that course. Furthermore, an absence on the date of scheduled tests, presentations or quizzes does not entitle you to recover/reschedule such tests. Failure to attend your midterm and/or final exam will result in an F grade on that paper/exam.

Learning outcomes: 

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize and understand the environmental variables that influence marketing activities
  • Define and explain the strategies and tactics that can lead to successful marketing given those environmental constraints
  • Utilize analytic tools and frameworks that managers use to conceive and execute marketing research and strategy
  • Understand how managers perform the functional tasks that constitute marketing such as collecting marketing intelligence and manipulating "mix" elements
  • Analyze a real-world case study involving complicated marketing issues and provide recommendations in both written form and in the form of a group presentation
Method of presentation: 

Lecture, class discussion, case study analysis, individual and group exercises, videos, field study.

Typical structure of a “theoretical” lecture:

  • First hour: students will be asked by the instructor about the topics of the chapter(s) and/or papers etc. they had to prepare for that lecture and they will be discussed together. Please note: students need to have read the chapter(s) and/or papers are indicated in the syllabus for that lecture, in order to be able to participate and take part in the discussion, as well as getting the oral participation credits.
  • Second hour: The instructor will give additional information to the sudents about the tiopic and make several examples that can also be discussed together. Sometimes students will be called to case studies’ discussions (either they had to prepare beforehand or that will be introduced in class by the instructor) and will need to try to solve concrete problems and issues that companies usually face.

Sometimes guest speakers and/or experts of a specific topic are going to be invited to to class, to hear from their direct experience.

Other lectures might take place out of class and directly on the field.

Required work and form of assessment: 
  • Midterm Exam - 30%
  • Final Exam - 20%
  • Group Project - 30%
  • Class Participation - 10%
  • Individual (written and oral) Presentation - 10%

Midterm Exam
The midterm exam will be taken in-class and may consist of questions in short answer or short essay format. Those topics and materials that are covered up until the midterm will be part of the exam.

Final Exam
The final exam will be taken in-class (at the end of the course) and may consist of questions in short answer or short essay format (same format as the midterm exam). Those topics and materials covered after the midterm exam will be part of the final exam.

Group Project
Students will have to work in teams (the number of members will depend on the class participants and will be defined after the first lecture week) to perform the group project they are assigned by the instructor at the beginning of the course, during the first lecture). Groups will have to work and meet outside class to work on the task they have been assigned.

The group project requires students to deal with and solve a specific real-world marketing problem; they are asked to solve as real marketing managers, employing the concepts learned and the tools seen in class. For instance, each group will be asked to perform market research and collect secondary and primary data to give an answer to the problem.

Students will have to prepare a written PPT presentation of 35-40 slides in which they:

  • Introduce the problem and explain how they are going to solve/answer it
  • Analyze the starting situation (market situation, market trends, competitive scenario, etc.), with the aid of secondary data they collected
  • Present the research method (which data have been collected and why and how the data have been analyzed)
  • Present the findings of their analysis
  • Translate findings in insights and useful managerial solutions and implications

Formal steps in class:

  • Group project assignment (during the first lecture)
  • Groups definition (defined after the first lecture week)
  • 1st Check the project (date TBD, 1 lecture right before the midterm exam): held in class with the instructor; students will be able to ask questions on how their work is going and on how to define the further steps (i.e. questions about data collection, work structure etc.)
  • 2nd Check the project (date TBD, 1 lecture at least one week before the project’s deadline): held in class with the instructor; students will be able to ask questions on how their work is going and on how to define the further steps (i.e. questions about data collection, work structure etc.)
  • The due date of the group project (date TBD, which will be before the final exam): students will have to hand in the written PPT presentation (sending it by e-mail to the instructor by midnight of the day before) and each group will also have 15 minutes to present their work in class (they can prepare a shorter presentation of approx. 15 slides for this purpose, which does not need to be handed in to the instructor) and answer questions from the instructor and other groups.

Teams will be graded on the basis of 4 items:

  • Planning and design:
  • Structure of the work itself: Is it structured clearly? Is information presented in a consistent way and is the information flow easily understandable for an “outside”-reader?
  • Is there an agenda at the beginning that helps in understanding what has been done in the work and why? Is the structure also clear as the work goes on?
  • Layout of the slides: clear layout and design, no images on the text, most relevant information of each slide highlighted, etc.)
  • Way the information is presented (clear and self explaining titles, well-structured sentences, etc.)
  • Analysis depth and methodology:
  • Once the goals of the work and preliminary information have been presented, the precise research question(s) need(s) to be clearly introduced
  • Is the research method that the group has chosen suitable for the research question of interest?
  • Is the methodology clearly explicated?
  • Which data have been collected and how? Clear presentation of what has been done and why, for which aim
  • Data presentation
  • How have data been analyzed (in which way and how in-depth does the analysis go)?
  • Accuracy and coherence (with theoretical topics):
  • Accuracy in the findings and insights presentation deriving from the analysis
  • The findings should be variegated, and the insights need to go in-depth, beyond a simple description of what has been found
  • How can the findings help the management? What should managers do? Very important: separation of strategic and operational/tactic level (see lectures in class)
  • Coherence with the proposed solutions and the findings
  • Coherence with the proposed solutions and the theoretical topics learned in class (consistency of what is proposed also from a theoretical perspective)
  • Creativity and innovation:
  • Has the group done a creative work? Did it try to think “out of the box” and find original approaches and solutions (in every aspect of the work: in terms of problem analysis, work presentation and idea development, etc.)
  • Are the proposed solutions and results innovative from a managerial standpoint?

Class Participation
A significant amount of class time will involve discussion of case studies and current periodicals, as well as individual and group exercises that introduce and reinforce key topics.  Therefore, students’ participation in class is essential and it will be assessed. Students are expected to have an active role in class, participating in class discussions and fulfilling the required work for each session.  In order to successfully meet this requirement, students should be prepared to devote significant time outside of class for reading and critical thinking. This course is fully integrated with Moodle, the IES Abroad online learning platform. Students will be required to actively access and interact with resources on this platform.

Individual (written + oral) Presentation
During the semester, each student will also have to write and then give an individual oral presentation. This presentation will require outside research. Each student must find an example of a marketing challenge faced by a company, and then explain how the challenge is directly linked to a topic of the syllabus that is done in class. A word output of approximately 5 pages must be handed in on the day of the oral presentation. For the oral presentation, which should last about 10 minutes (+ a couple of minutes for a Q&A session by the instructor and the class), no documents need to be prepared or handed in. Students can use videos, PPT presentations, the blackboard, or other tools they deem useful to present their topic the best. Both the written document and the oral presentation are going to be evaluated and weight respectively ¾ and ¼ of the total 10%. The date of the hand-in and oral presentation depend on the topic each student chooses from the syllabus, since the presentation date is on the day of that lecture.

Students will be given additional information regarding the requirements of each assignment and about deadlines after the course has started.

content: 

Session

Content

Assignments, related chapters and materials

1.

Course Overview & Marketing Basics (Part 1)

Group work explanation

 

2.

Marketing Basics (Part 2)

Consumer behavior: B2C and B2B

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.). CHAPTER 1: Marketing: creating and capturing customer value
  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.). CHAPTER 5: Consumer markets and consumer buyer behavior
  • "Sex and advertising: retail therapy" (2011), The Economist, December 17, 2011. Available online: http://www.economist.com/node/21541706
  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.). CHAPTER 6: Business markets and business buyer behavior
  • Rinallo D., Borghini S. and Golfetto F. (2010): “Exploring visitor experiences at trade shows”, Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, Vol. 25 Issue 4, pp. 249-258. DOI: 10.1108/08858621011038207.

3.

Market research (qualitative, quantitative and emerging techniques)

> In-class simulation of focus group and in-depth interviews

  • Naresh K Malhotra (2009). Marketing Research: An Applied Orientation, 6th Edition:

    • CHAPTER 4: Exploratory research design: secondary data
    • CHAPTER 5: Exploratory research design: qualitative research
    • CHAPTER 6: Descriptive research design: survey and observations
  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.). CHAPTER 4: Managing Marketing information to gain customer insights
  • Penenberg, Adam (2011). "NeuroFocus Uses Neuromarketing to Hack Your Brain," Fast Company, August 8, 2011. Available: http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/158/neuromarketing-intel-paypal

4.

Product management (+ new product development) (Part 1)

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.). CHAPTER 8: Products, Services and Brands: building customer value [for the Product part]
  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.). CHAPTER 9: New product development and product life cycle strategies
  • Gruley, Bryan (2014). “How the Swash Got Laughed Out of the Room - and Into Your Home”, Bloomberg, October 28, 2014. Available online here: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-10-28/p-g-whirlpool-skunkworks-cleans-your-smelly-shirts-fast.html

5.

Product management (+ new product development) (Part 2):

Barbie field study - MUDEC museum visit (out of class lecture)

 

Field study: discussion of theoretical concepts in a real environment

6.

Distribution and Retail (Part 1)

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.):

    • CHAPTER 12: Marketing channels: delivering customer value
    • CHAPTER 13: Retailing and wholesaling

7.

Distribution and Retail (Part 2)

Field Study: Discussion of theoretical concepts in a real environment

8.

1st Check on Project

 

9.

Midterm Exam

Pricing

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.):

    • CHAPTER 10: Pricing: understanding and capturing customer value
    • CHAPTER 11: Pricing strategies

10.

Communication, Promotion and Advertising (Part 1)

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.):

    • CHAPTER 14: Communicating customer value: integrated Marketing communication strategies
    • CHAPTER 15: Advertising and PR
    • CHAPTER 16: Personal selling and sales promotion
    • CHAPTER 17: Direct and online Marketing: building direct customer relationships

11.

Communication, Promotion and Advertising (Part 2)

In-class development of an advertising campaign.

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.):

    •  CHAPTER 14: Communicating customer value: integrated Marketing communication strategies
    • CHAPTER 15: Advertising and PR
    • CHAPTER 16: Personal selling and sales promotion
    • CHAPTER 17: Direct and online Marketing: building direct customer relationships

12.

Services marketing and Service Experience (with case discussion) (Part 1)

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.). CHAPTER 8: Products, Services and Brands: building customer value [for the Services part]
  • Christopher H Lovelock, Jochen Wirtz (2011). Service Marketing: CHAPTER 10: Crafting the Service environment
  • Bitner, M.J. (1992): “Servicescapes: The Impact of Physical Surroundings on Customers and Em-ployees”, Journal of Marketing, Vol. 56 Issue 2, pp. 57-71
  • OnTheGo case: Colm, L. and Ordanini, A. (2013). “Do not reckon without one’s host: Planned and unplanned consequences of servicescape on service innovation. The OnTheGo case”

13.

Services marketing and Service Experience (with case discussion) (Part 2)

Guest Lecture

 

14.

2nd Check on the project

 

15.

Experiential Marketing

  • Antonella Carù and Bernard Cova (2007). Consuming Experience:

    • CHAPTER 1: Consuming experience: an introduction
    • CHAPTER 3: Consumer immersion in an experiential context
  • Borghini S., Diamond N., Kozinets R.V., McGrath M.A., Muñiz A.M. and Sherry J. F. (2009): “Why Are Themed Brandstores So Powerful? Retail Brand Ideology at American Girl Place.”, Journal of Retailing., Vol. 85 Issue 3, pp.363-375. DOI: 10.1016/j.jretai.2009.05.003.

16.

Brand Management

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.). CHAPTER 8: Products, Services, and Brands: Building customer value [For the Brand part]

17.

Sustainable and Green Marketing

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.). CHAPTER 20: Sustainable Marketing

18.

International marketing+ cultural issues (Part 1)

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.). CHAPTER 19: The global marketplace

19.

International marketing+ cultural issues (Part 2)

Guest Lecture

 

20.

Group work presentations

 

21.

Wrap up and review of the course

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.). CHAPTER 19: The global marketplace

22.

Guest lecture (plenary) 

 

Instructors’ presentations and class-materials will be available online on Moodle after each lecture.

Required readings: 

Books:

  • P. KOTLER, G. ARMSTRONG, Principles of Marketing, Pearson Higher Education, 2011, Global Edition (14th ed.):
  • ALL CHAPTERS except 2, 3, 7, 8 (part about Brand management – the rest of the chapter is part of the program!), 18 and 20

​This book is available for free in a PDF version at the following link: http://www.e-library.esut.edu.ng/uploads/pdf/8596235739-principles-of-marketing.pdf

Some chapters of the following (all uploaded to Moodle):

  • Antonella Caru and Bernard Cova (2007). Consuming Experience. Selected topics:
  • CHAPTER 1: Consuming experience: an introduction
  • CHAPTER 3: Consumer immersion in an experiential context
  • Naresh K Malhotra (2009). Marketing Research: An Applied Orientation, 6th Edition. Selected topics:
  • CHAPTER 3: Research design
  • CHAPTER 4: Exploratory research design: secondary data
  • CHAPTER 5: Exploratory research design: qualitative research
  •  CHAPTER 6: Descriptive research design: survey and observations

Articles and Case Studies:

  • "Sex and advertising: retail therapy" (2011), The Economist, December 17, 2011. Available online: http://www.economist.com/node/21541706
  • Rinallo D., Borghini S. and Golfetto F. (2010): “Exploring visitor experiences at trade shows”, Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, Vol. 25 Issue 4, pp. 249-258. DOI: 10.1108/08858621011038207.
  • Penenberg, Adam (2011). "NeuroFocus Uses Neuromarketing to Hack Your Brain," Fast Company, August 8, 2011. Available: http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/158/neuromarketing-intel-paypal
  • Gruley, Bryan (2014). “How the Swash Got Laughed Out of the Room - and Into Your Home”, Bloomberg, October 28, 2014. Available online here: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-10-28/p-g-whirlpool-skunkworks-cleans-your-smelly-shirts-fast.html
  • Bitner, M.J. (1992): “Servicescapes: The Impact of Physical Surroundings on Customers and Em-ployees”, Journal of Marketing, Vol. 56 Issue 2, pp. 57-71 (uploaded on Moodle)
  • Borghini S., Diamond N., Kozinets R.V., McGrath M.A., Muñiz A.M. and Sherry J. F. (2009): “Why Are Themed Brandstores So Powerful? Retail Brand Ideology at American Girl Place.”, Journal of Retailing., Vol. 85 Issue 3, pp.363-375. DOI: 10.1016/j.jretai.2009.05.003. (uploaded on Moodle)
  • OnTheGo case: Colm, L. and Ordanini, A. (2013). “Do not reckon without one’s host: Planned and unplanned consequences of servicescape on service innovation. The OnTheGo case” (case collection) (uploaded on Moodle)
Previous Course Name: 
formerly IB 326 Marketing Management