Understanding Migration from Europe's Southern Border

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Course Information
Discipline(s): 
Political Science
Anthropology
Terms offered: 
Fall, Spring
Credits: 
3
Language of instruction: 
English
Prerequisites: 

None

Description: 

This course will analyze the multiple dimensions of contemporary migration in Spain and its current challenges. Since the 1980s, new migration flows have deeply changed Spanish society, becoming a central issue of many public policies. However, the political approaches to manage migration movements have not generally responded to the interests, personal projects, aspirations and needs of migrants, largely because migration is not understood from the local context: Why it happens and how it is perceived from sending countries.

The main migratory challenges in Spain will be studied from an Anthropological and a Political perspective. We will approach the analysis of migration policies and its determining factors as well as the experiences regarding the insertion of immigrants within Spanish society. For that purpose, the course emphasizes the understanding of migration from the countries of origin to the destination countries. From a global frame, a comparative analysis of bordering migratory flows in Spain and in the US will also be considered, as well as the most recent refugee movements affecting the core of the European Union.

Learning outcomes: 

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Understand contemporary migration flows from a complex and global perspective. 
  • Compare three migration flows to Spain (Latin American, Sub-Saharan Africa and Arab) with an emphasis on the causes of emigration and the incorporation of immigrants into Spanish society. 
  • Demonstrate the understanding of key concepts about migration flows and construct theoretical arguments. 
  • Understand the correlation between public policies and cultural integration. 
  • Develop critical thinking and cultural sensitivity in the analysis of migration.
Method of presentation: 

Lectures, class discussions, reflection on weekly readings, student presentations, guided field work and participative methodology. Diverse learning resources will be used: required readings, documentaries, films and newspaper articles.

Field study: 

Visits to institutions, immigrant associations and relevant neighborhoods to gain a deeper understanding of insertion experiences of immigrants in Granada. 

Required work and form of assessment: 
  • Class participation 10%
  • Midterm exam 25%
  • Research paper 35%
  • Final exam 30%

Class Participation
It includes attendance, reactions to readings and brief essays about some of the films and documentaries presented in class.

Midterm exam
An essay question and brief conceptual questions.

Research paper
Research paper based on case studies and ethnographies regarding immigrant communities in Spain. Research must follow the guidelines of the IES Abroad Institutional Review Board.  

Final exam
Essay questions.

 
content: 

Weeek

Content

Assignments

Week 1

Topic 1: Migration from a global perspective: Causes, challenges and reactions 

1.1 Why migration? Understanding the features and causes of international migration.

1.2 Perceptions towards immigration from Europe´s Southern Border.

1.3 Current challenges in Europe: Refugee crisis, economic crisis and cultural identity.

  • -Castles, S et al. Theories of migration in Castles, S et al. (eds) The age of migration:  International population movements in the modern world. The Guildford Press, 2013, pp. 20-47.
  • -Stolcke, V. Talking culture: new boundaries, new rethorics of exclusion in Europe, in Oso, L y Ribas, N (eds): The international handbook on gender, migration and transnationalism. Global and development perspectives. Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd, 2015, pp.69-96.
-Papagianni, G. Asylum in the twenty-first century: trends and challenges, in Triandafyllidou, A (ed) Routledge handbook of immigration and refugee studies. Routledge, 2015, pp. 320-330.
  -Documentary: District Zero. 2015  
Week 2 Topic 2: Immigration policies in Spain: managing migration from sending to receiving countries   2.1 Historical approaches to immigration in Spain.
  2.2 Immigration policies in Spain: From assimilation to co-development.
  2.2.1 Assimilation versus Integration policies.
  2.2.2 Policies intended to prevent migration: Development Aid policy and Co-development.
    -Aparicio, R. et al. Spanish legacies: The coming of age of the second generation. Selected chapter. University of California Press, 2016.
  -Cebolla, H and López Sala, A. Transnational immigrant organizations in Spain: Their Role in Development and Integration, in Portes, A and Fernandez-Kelly, A (eds) The state and the grassroots. Immigrant transnational organizations in four continents. Berghahan Books, 2015, pp.264-290.
  -Portes, A. Immigration, Transnationalism and development: the state of the question, in Portes, A and Fernandez-Kelly, A (eds) The state and the grassroots. Immigrant transnational organizations in four continents. Berghahan Books, 2015, pp. 1-24.
  -Film: Terraferma. Emanuele Crialese. 2011  
Week 3 Topic 3: Arabs and Muslims in Spain   3.1 Dominant perceptions about Arab immigrants in Spain.
  3.2 Analysis of conflicts and experiences of integration.
  3.3 Case study: The causes of Moroccan migration from the local context.
  3.4 Case study: From Tangiers to Barcelona. Spanish Development Aid Policy intended to prevent Moroccan migration.   Midterm Exam
   
    -Ramírez, A. Muslim women in the Spanish Press: the Persistence of Subaltern images, in Faegheh, Shirazi (ed) Muslim Women in war and crisis: Representations and reality, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2010, pp. 227-244.
  -Marín, I. “Revealing development: Contributions to the debate about migration and development from Morocco and Mexico”. Center for Migration and Development, Princeton University, 2011, 1-25.
  -Lacroix, T and Dumont, A. Moroccans in France: Their organizations and activities back home in Portes, A and Fernandez-Kelly, A (eds) The state and the grassroots. Immigrant transnational organizations in four continents. Berghahan Books, 2015, pp. 212-235.
  Course-related excursion: Institution for immigrants in Granada  
Week 4 Topic 4: Migration from Sub-Saharan Africa: The case of Senegalese immigrants   4.1 Migrations from Sub-Saharan Africa in Spain.
  4.2 Life experiences of Senegalese immigrants in Spain.
  4.3 Case study: Transnational practices of Senegalese immigrants to generate local development.  
    -De Haas, H. “The myth of invasion: the inconvenient realities of African migration to Europe”, Third world Quarterly, vol. 29 (7), 2008, 1305-1322.
  -Rosander, E. “Gender relations and female autonomy among Senegalese migrants in Spain: three cases from Tenerife”, African and Black diaspora: An international Journal, vol. 3 (1), 2010, 91-107.
  -Ifekwunigwe, J. “Voting with their feet: Senegalese youth, clandestine boat migration and the genedered politics of protest”, African And Black diaspora: An International Journal, vol. 6 (2), 2013, 218-235.
  -Film: Madame Brouette. Moussa Sene Absa. 2002  
Week 5 Topic 5: Latin American immigration in Spain   5.1 Historical background of Latin American immigration in Spain
  5.2 Ecuadorian women in Spanish society: Between the insertion in the global care chains and the return to Ecuador
  5.3 Case study: Mexican immigrants in the United States shaping local development: the role of Mexican hometown associations.    
    -Hierro, M. “Latin American migration to Spain: Main reasons and future perspectives”, International migration, vol. 54 (1), 2016, 64-83.
  -Parella, S. Latin American women during the Great recession in the US and Spain, in Cachón, L and Aysa-Lastra, M (eds) Immigrant vulnerability and resilience. Comparative perspectives on Latin American Immigrants during the Great Recession. Springer, 2015, pp.67-87.
  -Iskander, N. Partners in organizing: Engagement between migrants and the State in the production of Mexican Hometown associations in Portes, A and Fernandez-Kelly, A (eds) The State and the grassroots. Immigrant transnational organizations in four continents. Berghahan Books, 2015, pp.111-138.
  -Documentary: Those who remain. Carlos Hagerman and Juan Carlos Rulfo. 2008  
Week 6 -Research paper presentations
  -Round table discussion
  -Final exam  
 

 

Required readings: 
  • Aparicio, R. et al. Spanish legacies: The coming of age of the second generation. Selected chapter. University of California Press, 2016.
  • Castles, S et al. Theories of migration in Castles, S et al. (eds) The age of migration:  International population movements in the modern world. The Guildford Press, 2013.
  • Cebolla, H and López Sala, A. Transnational immigrant organizations in Spain: Their Role in Development and Integration in Portes, A and Fernandez-Kelly, A (eds) The state and the grassroots. Immigrant transnational organizations in four continents. Berghahan Books, 2015.
  • De Haas, H. “The myth of invasion: the inconvenient realities of African migration to Europe”, Third world Quarterly, vol. 29, issue 7, 2008.
  • Hierro, M. “Latin American migration to Spain: Main reasons and future perspectives”, International migration, vol. 54 (1), 2016.
  • Ifekwunigwe, J. “Voting with their feet: Senegalese youth, clandestine boat migration and the genedered politics of protest”, African And Black diaspora: An International Journal, vol 6, issue 2, 2013.
  • Iskander, N. Partners in organizing: Engagement between migrants and the State in the production of Mexican Hometown associations in Portes, A and Fernandez-Kelly, A (eds) The State and the grassroots. Immigrant transnational organizations in four continents. Berghahan Books, 2015. 
  • Lacroix, T and Dumont, A. Moroccans in France: Their organizations and activities back home in Portes, A and Fernandez-Kelly, A (eds) The state and the grassroots. Immigrant transnational organizations in four continents. Berghahan Books, 2015.
  • Marín, I. “Revealing development: Contributions to the debate about migration and development from Morocco and Mexico”. Center for Migration and Development, Princeton University, 2011.
  • Papagianni, G. Asylum in the twenty-first century: trends and challenges in Triandafyllidou, A (ed) Routledge handbook of immigration and refugee studies. Routledge, 2015.
  • Parella, S. Latin American women during the Great recession in the US and Spain, in Cachón, L and Aysa-Lastra, M (eds) Immigrant vulnerability and resilience. Comparative perspectives on LatinAmerican Immigrants during the Great Recession. Springer, 2015.
  • Portes, A. Immigration, Transnationalism and development: the state of the question in Portes, A and Fernandez-Kelly, A (eds) The state and the grassroots. Immigrant transnational organizations in four continents. Berghahan Books, 2015.
  • Ramírez, A. Muslim women in the Spanish Press: the Persistence of Subaltern images, in Faegheh, Shirazi (ed) Muslim Women in war and crisis: Representations and reality, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2010.
  • Rosander, E. “Gender relations and female autonomy among Senegalese migrants in Spain: three cases from Tenerife”, African and Black diaspora: An international Journal, vol. 3, issue 1, 2010.
  • Stolcke, V. Talking culture: new boundaries, new rethorics of exclusion in Europe in Oso, L y Ribas, N (eds): The international handbook on gender, migration and transnationalism. Global and development perspectives. Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. 2015