Shifting Paradigms from 'Domestic' to 'European' Politics: Germany in the European Union

You are here

Course Information
Program(s): 
Discipline(s): 
International Relations
Political Science
Terms offered: 
Fall, Spring
Credits: 
3
Language of instruction: 
German
Contact Hours: 
45
Prerequisites: 

Advanced German Language Standing (GR351 or above) and prior course work in Political Science.

Description: 

Offers both an introduction to German domestic politics and a study of the growing interdependence between German and European policy making. This course examines and analyzes current hot topics in German politics and the corresponding European politics and provides an overview of Germany’s party structure and political system while maintaining a continual focus on three core aspects of politics: economic, social and environmental policies. German domestic politics in these three areas and the different degrees of interaction and interdependence between German and European policies - revealing a growing tendency to transform “domestic” politics into integrated, supranational “European” politics - will be examined in depth

Attendance policy: 

All IES courses require attendance and participation. Attendance is mandatory per IES policy. Any unexcused absence will incur a penalty of 3% on your final grade. Any student who has more than three (3) unexcused absences will receive an “F” as the final grade in the course. Absences due to sickness, religious observances, and family emergencies may be excusable at the discretion of the Center Director.

In the case of an excused absence, it is the student’s responsibility to inform the Academic Dean of the absence with an Official Excused Absence Form, as well as any other relevant documentation (e.g. a doctor’s note), and to keep a record thereof. This form must be turned in as soon as possible before the class, in the case of a planned absence, or immediately after the class, in the case of an unplanned absence, in order for the absence to be considered excused. It is also the student’s responsibility to inform the professor of the missed class. Students can collect and submit the Official Excused Absence Form from the office of the Academic Dean.

Tests missed during unexcused absences cannot be made up.

Learning outcomes: 

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of Germany’s political and party system.
  • Demonstrate substantial knowledge of economic, social and environmental politics.
  • Establish awareness of the complexity of national and European politics.
  • Defend a critical stance with regard to current judgements of German politics and economics.
Method of presentation: 

Lectures and discussions; short student presentations

Required work and form of assessment: 
  • Participation (reading, homework, classroom-participation, two presentations) - 30%
  • Mid-term exam - 15%
  • Final exam -  15%
  • Term paper - 30%
  • Protocols, evaluations - 10%
content: 
SESSION CONTENT READING
1 Introduction to the course  

The German Federal Republic – History, Political System and EU politics

2 Overview of recent German history Thränhardt, Dieter: Bundesrepublik Deutschland - Geschichte und Perspektiven.
3 The German political system I: political institutions, their constitution, functions, and patterns of interaction

Pötzsch, Horst: Die Deutsche Demokratie

4 The German political system II: elections and electoral system Korte, Karl-Rudolf: Wahlen zum Deutschen Bundestag
5 The German political system III: actors and political participation Brunold, Andreas: Politische Partizipation am Beispiel „Stuttgart 21“
6 Germany and the EU: romance or pragmatic partnership? Müller-Brandeck-Bocquet, Gisela: Deutschland - Europas einzige Führungsmacht?
The Role of Parties in the German Political System
7 The German party system I: introduction and debate of the current election results Lösche, Peter: Verkannte Größe – Parteien in staatlichen Institutionen
8 The German party system II: overview of party profiles

Holtmann, Everhard: Strukturmuster der Gegenwart – ein „fluides“ Fünfparteiensystem

9 Alternative to party politics: Associations, unions and civil society initiatives in Germany and Europe

Griessinger, Andreas: Mehr Demokratie? Zivilgesellschaftliche Bewegungen in Deutschland und Europa von 1945-1990

10 MIDTERM  

Local Politics in Germany

11 The German „Kommunen“: Responsibilities and challenges in local politics Wehling, Hans-Georg: Rahmen kommunalpolitischen Handelns
12 Local Politics in Freiburg: How does the local parliament operate? „Was macht ein Stadtrat?“ „Wie funktioniert Politik in Freiburg?“

Reading to be asigned

13 Local politics in the European system of multi-level governance: Freiburg and/in Europe

Schäfer, Axel: Mehr als Lissabon: Europa und Kommunen

  EU Member States Trip
14 Economic policies and developments in Germany and the EU I: Overview since 1945 Berger, Johannes: Die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung der Bundesrepublik Deutschland
15 Economic policies and developments in Germany and the EU II: German economic policies in a comparative perspective Artus, Patrick: Deutsche Wirtschaftspolitik: ein Problem für Europa?
16 Social policy in Germany and the EU Reading to be asigned
17 Migration policy in Germany and the EU Bendel, Petra: Einwanderungspolitik in der EU – Kooperation und gemeinsame Gesetzgebung
18 Environment and energy policy in Germany and the EU Die nukleare Talfahrt/Deutschland wird erneuerbar
19 Concluding session: German domestic politics – towards European domestic politics? Sturm, Roland: Das europäisierte deutsche Regierungssystem
  FINAL EXAM  

 

Required readings: 
  • Thränhardt, Dieter: Bundesrepublik Deutschland - Geschichte und Perspektive, Bonn, bpb, 2009.
  • Pötzsch, Horst: Die Deutsche Demokratie. 5., überarbeitete und aktualisierte Auflage, Bonn, bpb, 2009, pp. 105-109.
  • Korte, Karl-Rudolf: Wahlen zum Deutschen Bundestag, in: Wahlen in Deutschland, Bonn, 2013, pp. 50-74.
  • Brunold, Andreas: Politische Partizipation am Beispiel „Stuttgart 21“, in: Politische Partizipation in Europa, Deutschland & Europa, Nr. 62, LpB, 2011, pp. 46-53.
  • Müller-Brandeck-Bocquet, Gisela: Deutschland - Europas einzige Führungsmacht? In: Deutsche Außenpolitik, APuZ, Nr. 10, 2012, pp. 16-22.
  • Lösche, Peter: Verkannte Größe – Parteien in staatlichen Institutionen, in: Parteiensystem der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Informationen zur politischen Bildung, Nr. 292, 2013, pp. 32-36.
  • Holtmann, Everhard: Strukturmuster der Gegenwart – ein „fluides“ Fünfparteiensystem, in: Der Parteienstaat in Deutschland. Erklärungen, Entwicklungen, Erscheinungsbilder, Bonn, bpb,  pp.  129-131.
  • Griessinger, Andreas: Mehr Demokratie? Zivilgesellschaftliche Bewegungen in Deutschland und Europa von 1945-1990, in: Bürgerbeteiligung in Deutschland und Europa,  LpB, Nr. 65, 2013, pp. 34-39.
  • Wehling, Hans-Georg: Rahmen kommunalpolitischen Handelns, in: Kommunalpolitik, Informationen zur politischen Bildung, Nr. 242, 2006, pp. 4-6.
  • Schäfer, Axel: Mehr als Lissabon: Europa und Kommunen, in: Die Monatszeitschrift für Kommunalpolitik (DEMO), 08.05.2008.
  • Berger, Johannes: Die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Bonn, bpb, 2012.
  • Artus , Patrick: Deutsche Wirtschaftspolitik: ein Problem für Europa?, in: WISO direkt, Bonn, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, 2010.
  • Bendel, Bendel: Einwanderungspolitik in der EU – Kooperation und gemeinsame Gesetzgebung, in: Migration in Europa, Deutschland & Europa, Nr. 60, LpB, 2010 pp.26-29.
  • Die nukleare Talfahrt/Deutschland wird erneuerbar, In: Tschernobyl, Magazin zur Atompolitik, Ed. Bundesministerium für Umwelt, Naturschutz und Reaktorsicherheit, Berlin, 2006, pp. 6-7/8-9.
  • Sturm, Roland: Das europäisierte deutsche Regierungssystem, In: Klemens H. Schrenk; Markus Soldner (Hrsg.): Analyse demokratischer Regierungssysteme, Wiesbaden, 2010,  pp. 185-199