Europe - The Dynamics of Integration

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Course Information
Program(s): 
Discipline(s): 
Political Science
History
Terms offered: 
Fall, Spring
Credits: 
3
Language of instruction: 
English
Prerequisites: 

Prior coursework in History

Description: 

Today’s EU is the result of a long development of European integration. The idea itself can be traced back to the 14th century, but only developed political momentum after WW I and was finally put into place after WW II. Keeping the peace and Economic prosperity among European countries were driving factors of the idea from the beginning. The establishment of the EEC in 1957 thus far kept this promise and provided Europe with over 55 years of peace and increasing prosperity, first in the western parts and after 1989 extending it step by step to all of Europe. This course will examine the dynamics of this ever-deeper and wider integration and discuss the idea of a European “Manifest Destiny”.

Attendance policy: 

All IES courses require attendance and participation. Attendance is mandatory per IES policy. Any unexcused absence will incur a penalty of 3% on your final grade. Any student who has more than three (3) unexcused absences will receive an “F” as the final grade in the course. Absences due to sickness, religious observances, and family emergencies may be excusable at the discretion of the Center Director.
In the case of an excused absence, it is the student’s responsibility to inform the Academic Dean of the absence with an Official Excused Absence Form, as well as any other relevant documentation (e.g. a doctor’s note), and to keep a record thereof. This form must be turned in as soon as possible before the class, in the case of a planned absence, or immediately after the class, in the case of an unplanned absence, in order for the absence to be considered excused. It is also the student’s responsibility to inform the professor of the missed class. Students can collect and submit the Official Excused Absence Form from the office of the Academic Dean.

Tests missed during unexcused absences cannot be made up!

Learning outcomes: 

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  • Discuss the idea of European integration from its beginnings and the various fields of integration.
  • Map out plans for European integration in mind maps (institutional architecture)
  • Differentiate between deeper and wider integration.
  • Distinguish between intergovernmentalism and supranationalism within the European integration context
  • Compare various countries with regard to their accession processes into the EU
  • Apply the classroom content outside of class during personal and field study travel
  • Learn to utilize sources for written assignments
Method of presentation: 
  • Lectures
  • Activities
  • Discussions
  • Short student presentations on the relevant subjects.
Required work and form of assessment: 
  • Presentations - 10%
  • Participation - 20%
    • In-class - 10%
    • Moodle discussions - 5%
    • Activities - 5%
  • Midterm Examination - 20%
  • Term paper outline - 5%
  • Term Paper - 25%
  • Final Examination - 20%

Presentations
Each student has to present one monument with significance to European History. The monument can be located anywhere in Europe but must be visited by the student in person during the course of the term. Ideally, students choose monuments visited during one of the IES led field study trips. The student must discuss proposed monument with instructor and cannot change monument without instructor approval. During the presentation, the student must briefly describe the monument, its location, and point out its key features and explain their meaning. Finally, the student has to put the monument into the context of European History. During the local field trip in week one, two monuments are visited and a short presentation given on both of them to provide students with an understanding of the concept. The presentation shall not last longer than 5 to 10 min, and an entry of the content in the Moodle glossary is required. The entry must follow the provided format by the instructor.The student is expected to discuss possible monuments with the instructor no later than the assigned date. The second presentation is a short summary of the student’s term paper to be given during the class session that covers the accession process of the country in question. Each student is expected to state the thesis of the paper, discuss the arguments used and the conclusion reached. The presentation is strictly limited to 5mins.

Term Paper
Each student has to write a 12 - 15 pages long term paper (double spaced) on the accession process of one member state to the EC or EU (depending on the date of entry). The paper shall analyze the following aspects: Reasons for joining the EC/EU, major obstacles during the accession process, public opinion within the acceding country, role as a member state and student’s assessment of the countries performance since accession with a focus on their role towards further integration. Students are expected to use a set of primary and secondary sources, demonstrating a critical approach to the used material. The term paper will be graded on format, structure and content. Student and instructor must agree on chosen country and student cannot change country without prior approval by instructor. Each student has to pick a country by the assigned date and confirm their choice with the instructor. Students are encouraged to choose the country represented during Model EU, unless it is one of the six original members. These cannot be chosen. Furthermore, each student has to turn in an outline of the paper that discusses the sources intended to be used, the possible thesis and the structure of the paper by the assigned date. It is highly recommended to start work on the paper as early as possible.

Mid-Term
The midterm exam is a written test that consists out of three parts. First part is a take home essay on a central question (30points), second part are 20 multiple choice questions (40 points) and the final part is a mind map outlining the setup of one specific idea of European integration. The multiple choice questions are based on the assigned reading and the mind map is reflected through the discussed documents.

Final
The final exam consists of three essay questions. One mandatory essay question will be on the overall topic of the course and two essay questions can be chosen out of a set of four questions relating to the topics discussed during the second part of the course.

Moodle
Moodle is the platform where students can find all readings and all course information. It is the most up-to-date information and is to be consulted by students on a regular basis (at least once every 48hrs). Part of the participation grade for this course is based on the student’s participation on Moodle. The quantity (and more importantly the quality) of postings to class discussions is one determining factor for the grade. In general, all assignments are turned in via Moodle. The instructor does not except any assignments turned in by email or in hard copy, unless clearly stated otherwise. Grades are also made available through Moodle. Students will also find all session slides, additional resources, further reading suggestions and web based trainings on various topics on Moodle.

Participation
Participation grade is not a grade that reflects attendance. It solely reflects a student’s activity in the class room, on Moodle and the student’s homework as well as group projects. 30% of the participation grade is given after session 10, the reminding participation grade is given after session 20. Participation grades are commented and students are encouraged to discuss these with the instructor. The use of mobile devices (smart devices) during class carry a penalty of up to 30 points on the overall participation grade. The instructor may indicate the use of mobile devices during class for special purposes.

content: 

 

Session Topic(s) Reading(s) and Document(s)
Part I: European Ideas
1

Introduction: The Quest for a European “Manifest Destiny”
Presentation of Course – Manifest Destiny – Definitions of Europe – Idea of Europe

Reading:

  • Anthony Pagden, The Idea of Europe: From Antiquity to the European Union, Introduction
2 Freiburg: The Austrians, the French and the 2nd Reich
Excursion to Freiburg with focus on Vauban fortress, Siegesdankmal and Quaker Barracks
3

The origin of the European Idea: From 1306 to 1913
Pierre Dubois – William Penn – Vienna Congress – Balance of Power – Globalized World 1913

 

Monument Presentation & Term Paper Discussion

Reading:

  • No reading but homework! Check Moodle for details.

Document:

  • William Penn: An Essay towards the Present and Future Peace of Europe, by the establishment of a European Dyet, Parliament, or Estates (1693)
4 European Movements form 1914 to 1945
Mitteleuropa - Treaty of Versailles – Paneuropa-Union – European Federal Union

Reading:

  • Peter Stirk: Integration and Disintegration before 1945, Ch. 1.

Document:

  • Mitteleuropa plan (1915)
  • European Movement (1923)
  • Briand’s plan for a Federal Union (1930)
5

What kind of Union?
Theories on European Integration - The Marshall Plan - OEEC - Treaty of Brussels - EUF - the German Question - Three Phases of Ideas: A final discussion

Reading:

  • Mark Gilbert, European Integration – A Concise History, Ch. 2, Enemies to Partners

Document:

  • The Schuman Plan (1950) / The Zurich Speech (1946)
Part II: European Organizations
6

Europe of Communities
European Coal and Steel Community - European Defense Community - Treaty of Rome

 

Outline of Term Paper due (Moodle Upload)

Reading:

  • Mark Gilbert, Ch. 3, Ever Closer Union

Document:

  • The treaties compared
     
7

Field Trip Assignment: France, de Gaulle and the EU
Visit to the de Gaulle exhibition – Group work on de Gaulle during the 40s, 50s and 60s and his picture of Europe – Results in Group presentation!

Institution Field Trip

8 The Europe of the Seven
The Nordic Council - GBs "Three Phases" - EFTA

Reading:

  • Derek Urwin, Ch. 7, Europe of the Seven

Document:

  • EFTA
9 Other European Integration Movements
Council of Europe - COMECON - Warsaw Pact - OECD - OSCE - Final Discussion: Why did the EU succeed to become the dominant organization

Reading:

  • tba

Document:

  • EFTA
10 Midterm Exam on Part I and II
Part III: Road to European Unity
11

Road to European Unity I - The 1960s
  
Charles de Gaulle – Fouchet Plan – Empty Chair Crisis – Luxembourg Compromise

Reading:

  • Mark Gilbert, Ch. 4, In the Shadow of the General

Document:

  • Fouchet Plan and Luxembourg Compromise
12 Road to European Unity II - 1970s
The Hague Summit -  European Political Cooperation – European Monetary System – Institutional change

Reading:

  • Mark Gilbert, Ch. 5, Weathering the Storm

Document:

  • Communiqué issued by the by the heads of State or of Government at their Meeting in The Hague, December 1969.
13 Road to European Unity III - The 1980s
The case of Great Britain - The Single European Act - The Single Market Program – The Delors Plan

Reading:

  • Mark Gilbert, Ch. 6, The 1992 Initative

Document:

  • Thatcher’s Bruges speech
14

Road to European Union IV - The 1990s
EMS crises – Treaty of European Union – EMU – Treaty of Amsterdam – Treaty of Nice – Lisbon Treaty

 

Term Paper due (Moodle Upload)

EU Member States Trip

Reading:

  • Desmond Dinan, Europe Recast, Achieving European Union (Ch. 7)
  • The Challenges of EU (Ch. 8 excerpt)

Document:

  • Kohl’s Europe speech
Part IV: Enlargement - Manifested?
15 The Question of Enlargement: The struggle for enlargement
The first applicants – Talks during the 1960s – The 1973 enlargement

Reading:

  • Johnny Laursen, The Experience of Enlargement, p. 269 – 290

Document:

  • Reaction to De Gaulle’s veto
16 The Southern and Northern enlargements
Greek application – Portuguese and Spanish applications – The end of the cold war – Northern enlargement

Reading:

  • Johnny Laursen, The Experience of Enlargement, p. 291 – 304

Document:

  • Commission Opinion on Greek Application for Membership
17 The Eastern Enlargement
Perestroika– Association Agreements with CEE – Financial Aid - Copenhagen Criteria - Beyond Copenhagen - Negotiation Process – Did Eastern Enlargement matter?
 

Reading:

  • John O’Brennan, The Eastern Enlargement of the European Union, Ch. 2, 3 and 4.

Document:

  • Copenhagen declaration
18 The Western Balkan
A short history of the Western Balkan – Accessing the situation: When can enlargement be expected
 

Reading:

  • None. See assigned document

Document:

  • EU Commission Report
19 Beyond the EU
Various levels of European Integration – Island and Norway: A Nordic alternative to EU membership?Beyond the EU: European Economic Area - Eastern Partnership – Union of the Mediterranean

Reading:

  • tba

Document:

  • See Moodle
20 Conclusion - A European "Manifest Destiny"?
Deeper, wider or less integration? A final assessment

Reading:

  • Camron’s EU speech
21 Final Exam Preparation (optional)
22 Final Exam

 

Required readings: 
  • Dinan, Desmond. Europe Recast: A Histroy of European Union. Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publ. 2004.
  • Gilbert, Mark. European Integration: A Concise History. Plymouth: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group 2012.
  • Laursen, Johnny. “The Enlargement of the European Community, 1950 – 95” In Loth, Wilfried (ed.). Experiencing Europe: 50 years of European Construction 1957 – 2007. Baden-Baden: Nomos 2009. P. 269 – 304.
  • O’Brennan, John. The Eastern Enlargement of the European Union. Abingdon: Routledge 2006.
  • Pagden, Anthony (ed.). The idea of Europe: From Antiquity to the European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2002.
  • Stirk, Peter. “Integration and Disintegration before 1945.” In Desmond, Dinan (ed.). Origins and Evolution of the European Union. Oxford: Oxford University Press 2006. P. 31 – 54.
  • Urwin, Derek. The Community of Europe: A History of European Integration since 1945. London: Longman 1995 (2nd edition).